Travel Around the World in 46 Cookies (Cheaper than Airfare) ~ Food52

There are bar crawls and taco crawls and even cupcake crawls, so why not cookie crawls? Why not cookie crawls around the world?

We’ve taken that sugar-drunk fantasy and made it a reality. We’ve rounded of 46 Cookies of the World that feature the kooky, classic, and addictive recipes from our staff, friends, and community members just so you can country hop, cookie-style.

1. Nanaimo Bars (Nanaimo, Canada)

Another reason to consider moving to Canada. (Photo: Lillie Auld/Food52)

2. Pennsylvania Dutch Christmas Cookies (Pennsylvania, U.S.)

This straight-laced cookie is brightened by currants and a bit of lemon juice and zest, and a lashing of sweet glaze. (Photo: James Ransom/Food52)

3. Rainbow Cookies (New York, U.S.)

What’s better than a technicolor platter of classic Italian bakery cookies? (Photo: Nina Caldas/Food52)

4. Potato Chip Cookies (Saratoga Springs, U.S.)

 

This recipe proves that with some arm work and a not-so-secret ingredient, you can make the best cookies you’ll ever taste.(Photo: Linda Xiao/Food52)

5. Benne Wafers (South Carolina, U.S.)

These wafer-thin, sesame-seed studded cookies are lacey, crunchy, and caramel-colored, a.k.a. the perfect holiday treat. (Photo: James Ransom/Food52)

6. Prune & Chocolate Rugelach (New York, U.S.)

This classic Jewish cookie meets American, Hungarian, Serbian, and Israeli influences. (Photo: Bobbi Lin/Food52)

7. Black & White Cookies (New York, U.S.)

Bring New York to You (with Mini Black and White Cookies). (Photo: Yossy Arefi/Food52)

8. Bizcochitos (New Mexico, U.S.)

Made with lard, these cookies improve with age—so plan ahead! (Photo: Linda Xiao/Food52)

9. Mexican Wedding Cakes (Mexico)

This is a cookie recipe with a controversial past. (Photo: Linda Xiao/Food52)

10. Brigadeiros (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)

Brazilians grow up eating Brigadeiro, which are at every birthday party and pretty much any kind of celebration. (Photo: Linda Xiao/Food52)

11. Alfajores (Argentina)

The only thing that Argentineans love more than hefty pieces of steak and strong coffee is alfajores. (Photo: Sophia Real/Food52)

12. Serinakaker (Norway)

A classic Norwegian butter cookie perfect for ski trips, snowshoeing, and Christmas cookie tins. (Photo: Emily Vikre/Food52)

13. Swedish Rye Cookies (Sweden)

This is a classic Christmas cut-out cookie with rye flour and cream cheese dough (and a lot more personality). (Photo: Heidi Swanson/Food52)

14. Polish Apricot-Filled Cookies (Poland)

A family cookie recipe that the editors of “Gourmet” deemed the best of 2004. (Photo: Linda Xiao/Food52)

15. Pfeffernuse (Germany)

An updated, but true to form, take on a vintage German spice cookie. (Photo: James Ransom/Food52)

16. Austrian Vanilla Crescents (Vanillekipferl) (Austria)

Vanilla crescents appear unspectacular—just little sugar-coated biscuits among all the colorful Christmas biscuits—but their flavor and texture will win you over. (Photo: James Ransom/Food52)

17. Vanilice (Serbia)

This cookie was voted Your Best Holiday Cookie from Anywhere in the World! (Photo: James Ransom/Food52)

18. Koulourakia (Greek Sesame Twist Cookies) (Greece)

A not-too-sweet cookie recipe passed from one new immigrant family to another. (Photo: James Ransom/Food52)

19. Pain d’Amande (France)

A cookie for all your gifting, swapping, and impressing needs this holiday season. (Photo: James Ransom/Food52)

20. Brandy Snaps (U.K.)

Sometimes it’s the recipes, more than the memories, that show you about your ancestors. (Photo: Linda Xiao/Food52)

21. Maltese Lemon Christmas Cookies (Malta)

In Malta, it’s the smell of lemon—not chocolate or peppermint or cinnamon—that means Christmas. (Photo: Meikie Peters/Food52)

22. Spanish Butter Wafers (Spain)

The best friend your tea (or wine) will have this holiday season. (Photo: Linda Xiao/Food52)

23. Tehina Shortbread (Israel)

Traditional shortbread—with an Israeli twist. (Photo: Michael Persico/Food52)

24. Samsa (Almond-Orange Triangles) (Northern Africa (Morocco, Tunisia & Algeria)

A cousin to baklava, samsa get fried instead of baked. (Yum!) (Photo: Linda Xiao/Food52)

25. Chin Chin (Nigeria)

Meet Chin Chin: the cutest Christmas cookie on the planet. (Photo: Linda Xiao/Food52)

26. Nigerian Coconut Cookie Crisps (Nigeria)

A cracker-like coconut cookie with serious nostalgia power. (Photo: Linda Xiao/Food52)

27. Halawa (Halva) Truffles (Egypt)

These Middle Eastern and African cookies are bite-sized and ideal for dipping in tea. (Photo: Jonathan Gregson/Food52)

28. Mbatata (Sweet Potato Cookies) (Malawi)

Sweet potato cookies to commemorate the Malawian people. (Photo: Linda Xiao/Food52)

29. Chocolate Pepper Cookies (South Africa)

Spice things up: Add black pepper to your next batch of chocolate cookies. (Photo: Linda Xiao/Food52)

30. Basler Leckerli (Waldshut-Tiengen, Southern Germany)

The German boyfriend came and went, but this spice cookie recipe is still kicking it. (Photo: James Ransom/Food52)

31. Elisenlebkuchen (Nuremberg, Germany)

Of all the German gingerbread out there, here’s the one that will be your new favorite. (Photo: Sophia Real/Food52)

32. Buccellati (Sicilian Christmas Cookies) (Sicily, Italy)

Festive fig cookies that taste of a Sicilian Christmas. (Photo: Emiko Davies/Food52)

33. Ukrainian Curd Cheese Cookies (Ukraine)

Who’s to say that cheese doesn’t belong in a cookie? (Photo: Linda Xiao/Food52)

34. Rice Cookies with Cardamom and Rose Water (Kermanshah, Iran)

Gluten-free cookies with subtle floral kick. (Photo: Bobbi Lin/Food52)

35. Springerles (Germany)

Springerles, a biscotti-like biscuit with an odd-ball technique. (Photo: Food52)

36. Dorie Greenspan’s Stained Glass Cookies (Paris, France)

To make these elegant French sugar cookies, bien sûr! (Photo: Linda Xiao/Food52)

37. Struffoli (Italian Honey Ball Cookies) (Southern Italy)

Make a batch of these southern Italian cookies this holiday season and they’ll become a tradition for years to come. (Photo: Angela Brown/Food52)

38. Alice Medrich’s Buckwheat Thumbprint Cookies with Cherry Preserves (Russia)

A flavorful upgrade to the classic Russian Tea Cake. (Photo: Mark Weinberg/Food52)

39. Chickpea Flour (Besan) Laddu (India)

If you’ve never heard of laddus, just think of them as balls of sweet goodness. (Photo: Nik Sharma/Food52)

40. Coconut Milk Fudge (India)

An ancient Gujarati sweet—with a time-saving update. (Photo: David Loftus/Food52)

41. Chinese Peanut Cookies (China)

Buttery, nutty cookies to make this holiday. (Photo: Linda Xiao/Food52)

42. Matcha Butter Cookies (Japan)

The Japanese love flavoring desserts with the distinct, bitter flavor of matcha tea, and these cookies are no exception. (Photo: Emiko Davies/Food52)

43. Polvorón (Philippines)

These polvorónes—traditional Filipino cookies—do everything the cookies on that holiday platter you got this year don’t do. (Photo: Linda Xiao/Food52)

44. Tangerine Pies “Kuey Tarts” (Singapore)

These whimsically filled cookies have a deceptive name. (Photo: Pate Eng/Food52)

45. Mint Slices (Australia)

Sorry Girl Scouts, but these Australian Mint Slices might just give your Thin Mints a run for their money. (Photo: Sarah Coates/Food52)

46. Mango Melting Moments (Australia)

A classic Australian cookie with a “locally sourced” filling. (Photo: Emiko Davies/Food52)

https://www.yahoo.com/food/food-travel-around-the-world-in-46-cookies-173649532.html

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Here Is A Blog With Photos Of Vegan Food From Literally Every Single Country In The World by Christine Byrne

Animal rights activists Ryan Huling, 31, and Joel Bartlett, 34, are both avid travelers who’ve managed to stick to their vegan diets everywhere they go.

Animal rights activists Ryan Huling, 31, and Joel Bartlett, 34, are both avid travelers who've managed to stick to their vegan diets everywhere they go.

This vegan take on classic Brazilian stroganoff, is served at Rio Vegano in Rio de Janeiro.

So, they decided to start a blog to prove that eating vegan while traveling isn’t only possible, it can be downright delicious…

So, they decided to start a blog to prove that eating vegan while traveling isn't only possible, it can be downright delicious...

This falafel from Paris’s legendary L’as du Fallafel is just as tasty as any boeuf bourguignon you’d find at a Parisian bistro.

…and that cruelty-free food is a pleasure, not a burden.

...and that cruelty-free food is a pleasure, not a burden.

This root vegetable and hummus platter from Glo Laugavegi in Iceland.

Starting in early 2015, they posted one photo a day on Vegan Wanderlust, each one showcasing a vegan dish from a different country.

Starting in early 2015, they posted one photo a day on Vegan Wanderlust, each one showcasing a vegan dish from a different country.

Coconut-based cheesecake in a jar from the United Arab Emerates.

A few of the photos are taken by Huling and Bartlett, but most have been submitted by fellow vegan travelers.

A few of the photos are taken by Huling and Bartlett, but most have been submitted by fellow vegan travelers.

This sabaayad–flaky flatbread from Somalia.

They pledged to continue posting until every country in the world was represented.

They pledged to continue posting until every country in the world was represented.

A veggie burger from Guatemala.

Their project proves that veganism is possible anywhere, not just in affluent countries where an animal-free diet might be “trendy.”

Their project proves that veganism is possible anywhere, not just in affluent countries where an animal-free diet might be "trendy."

Bayo Adedge / Via veganwanderlust.org

This is a banana with strawberry jam and “groundnut spread” (basically peanut butter) wrapped in flatbread, from Burundi in East Africa.

Some of the foods highlighted are decadently outrageous, like this “Vegan McGriddle” from The Badasserie in Downtown Los Angeles.

Some of the foods highlighted are decadently outrageous, like this "Vegan McGriddle" from The Badasserie in Downtown Los Angeles.

Others are simple and wholesome, like this plate from a restaurant in Benin, a tiny country in West Africa.

Others are simple and wholesome, like this plate from a restaurant in Benin, a tiny country in West Africa.

A lot of the dishes, like this communal bowl of rice topped with cassava leaves from Sierra Leone, are traditional local foods that just happen to be vegan.

A lot of the dishes, like this communal bowl of rice topped with cassava leaves from Sierra Leone, are traditional local foods that just happen to be vegan.

Others are vegan versions of iconic foods, like this full English Breakfast from Cornucopia in Ireland.

Others are vegan versions of iconic foods, like this full English Breakfast from Cornucopia in Ireland.

There’s even a plate of avocado maki served at a research station in ANTARCTICA.

There's even a plate of avocado maki served at a research station in ANTARCTICA.

Yesterday, the final photo was published on Vegan Wanderlust — a veggie plate from a Juice bar in St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

Yesterday, the final photo was published on Vegan Wanderlust — a veggie plate from a Juice bar in St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

So, never worry that you won’t be able to find great, vegan food on your next exotic vacation.

So, never worry that you won't be able to find great, vegan food on your next exotic vacation.

Vegan carrot cake from Babette Bakery in Luxembourg.

Delicious, animal-free options are available literally EVERYWHERE.

Delicious, animal-free options are available literally EVERYWHERE.

Fried potato pakoras from Veg-Delight in Malawi.

http://www.buzzfeed.com/christinebyrne/vegan-wanderlust#.pmgWN9y1Z5

My Indian Parents Are Huge Fans of Cultural Appropriation, Even While My Generation Finds it Appalling ~ Nikita Redkar

I have never been a fan of yoga, yet I gave it a fighting chance, partly because I felt it was my cultural duty to do so. 

Back in India, yoga is associated less with athleticism and more with spirituality and health. My grandmother was rendered almost entirely disabled due to a serious case of Parkinson’s, yet with the help of daily, soft yoga and regular meditation, she has begun to walk again with polished joints feeling as good as new. My grandfather, through repeated practice, claims to have come to clarity with his place under the gods and in the world, and at 80 years old still possesses the limbs and lungs of a much younger man. 

My mother taught me a variety of yoga poses that, with patience, could function in lieu of medicine: stretches to alleviate menstrual pain, postures that helped with digestion, and repetitive chants to build memory and increase focus. Whether they held true or were kid-tested, mother-approved placebos to build will in us both, it was ultimately yoga. It was the collection of asanas and pranayamas that my people had crafted and curated and concocted to promote health, harmony, and spirituality. 

So you can see, when this cultural discipline turned into a billion-dollar industry featuring yoga pants and perky butts, a function for absolving the guilt-laden consumption of eating too many slices of pizza, or being an extracurricular duty of the suburban white mother, I was slightly perplexed. Which is not to say that I have never gorged on ice cream with the promise of later engaging in power stretching in a room hot enough to shame Arizona summers. I have done yoga for tranquility as much as I’ve done it for a tight tummy. Although when I attend those classes, I find yoga syncing closer with white girls with Starbucks than it does with an ancient Indian practice. It’s the women in those classes who go home and take #cultured selfies with Bindis and want to go to India to “find themselves.” And I, for one, have had it with selective cultural adoption. 

I expressed this sentiment to my parents and to my surprise, they saw nothing wrong with people of other races cherry-picking parts of Indian culture. They lauded Jillian Michaels’ yoga series, embraced Selena Gomez’s and Iggy Azalea’s respective interweaving of Indian culture with western music, and admired Kendall Jenner for adorning a bindi at Coachella. To them, it was a sign of their culture gaining mainstream acceptance. To me, it was thievery and a selfish promotion tactic.

What shift in mindset occurred in the span of one generation that placed me on a starkly different side of the spectrum from my parents? 

Iggy Azalea dons Indian clothing in an effort to differentiate her music and gain publicity.
Iggy Azalea dons Indian clothing in an effort to differentiate her music and gain publicity.

My parents emigrated from India to America in 1991, and had me two years later. I was born one culture, yet born in another one. From as long as I can remember, I have constantly been reminded of my other-ness. I was bullied so much for my school lunches that I often boycotted eating all together. Kids reduced me to my country’s worst stereotype — being eternally stinky from eating curry — and mercilessly mocked me for putting coconut oil in my hair, a typical home practice in India to maintain our thick hair. 

I remember an Indian girl in my 4th grade class who hung out with the popular girls because she had the luxury of residing right next door to our grade’s queen bee. She quietly parted from her friends and came up to me while I was crying in the library. With a deceptive cool masking the inkling of solidarity in her tone, she told me: “Don’t worry. My mom puts oil on my hair too. Just make sure you do it during the weekend and wash it off before you come to school.” Looking back at that now, I realized us first-generation kids spend our most formative years trying to fit into a culture that demands assimilation while simultaneously barring us from it. 

Fast forward to my twenties and I can see the slightest hints of cultural shame still lingering within many of my friends. My Indian friends get visibly embarrassed when their music playlist “accidentally” shuffles to Hindi music; music which they all colloquially refer to as a “guilty pleasure.” They put time and sweat into practicing traditional dance styles like bharatnatyam and raas and garba but when asked to describe their activities to non-Indians, will just call it their “dance team.” 

We have all grown to accept and love our brownness, yet the relentless battle for assimilation has left so many bruises that instinctively provoke knee-jerk responses to ensure distance from our Otherness. We spent our whole lives trying to love our parents’ culture and accepting ourselves as the curry-eating, oil-scrubbing, naturally-tanned selves we are, but we never really did. And we thought nobody else really would either — even those who share our background. 

For those of us who grew up in a Pakistani, Sri Lankan, Bangladeshi, or Nepali household, our struggles to fit in are vastly different in magnitude, but the solidarity exists. So that’s why we are upset when someone wakes up one day and decides to exploit our turbulent identities as a disposable fashion — and by doing so be rewarded as a paragon of globalization and cultural acceptance. How dare they regard Indian fashion as effortlessly cool and chic while we make it look “fobby,” or a stubborn adherence to our culture that purports us to be “fresh off the boat.” 

How dare they have a crush when we spent our entire lives trying to love. 

Our parents, on the other hand, never came to this country for assimilation; they came here for survival. They knew from the onset they weren’t going to be accepted. They grew up embedded in a deep sense of cultural identity — one that everyone around them shared. They always knew where they are from and they owned it, even when they arrived in America. Our parents grew up in a time where white people were inherently superior, and while it was commonplace for Indians to ditch their traditional clothing for jeans and t-shirts, white people were reluctant to do the same for them. 

Years later, our parents’ generation is bursting with pride at the thought of all the customs they accepted being embraced by the mainstream — whether it’s being exoticized or not. Our parents see the western infatuation with select parts of their otherwise deeply rich culture less as self-promotion and more as an acknowledgement; it is a cross-cultural equalization they could have never dreamed of. 

My generation of Indian-Americans is not really Indian, and not really American. Our endless journey to fit into the western mainstream while trying to retain our roots left us — and continues to leave us — in an eternal purgatory of identities; Americans getting to be fully American and a little bit of Indian — whenever they please — isn’t fair. Yet I know it isn’t right to outright ban non-Indians wearing Indian clothes because the intentions are never malicious — plus I know my parents are happy to see them. 

But the beauty of culture lies in every single part of its intricate details, and hand-picking a favorite few while discarding the rest is taking for granted the best parts of that culture. At the end of the day, your bindi selfies will eventually disappear on social media’s news feeds, you’ll take your colorful sari off, and you can go back to being American whenever you want. But for my generation, we can never go home and remove our heritage, our culture, and our riddled identity struggle. 

Our parents definitely had their struggles, but they never compromised their cultural integrity. They proudly donned their saris and kurtas, brought their food in curry-stained tupperware to work without a care of what anyone else will think. They knew they were outsiders and were never trying to fit in in the first place. To them, selective adoption of Indian customs and fashion is a compliment, a recognition, and not a double standard of acceptance. And that’s why they’ll continue bask in the appreciation we deem appropriation.

http://www.xojane.com/issues/my-indian-parents-are-fans-of-cultural-appropriation

VitaSoul – HH The Dalai Lama

“We can make this a more peaceful century if we cherish non-violence and concern for others’ well-being. It is possible. If the individual is happier, his or her family is happier; if families are happy, neighbourhoods and nations will be happy. By transforming ourselves we can change our human way of life and make this a century of compassion.”

Salubrious Saturday – What Does the World Eat for Breakfast?

This I found to be a fun little side trip into the ever popular world of breakfast. So what does the world eat for breakfast? Well for me eggs are always a safe bet, but some of these other options look quite good. I do love food. Stay Healthy and Enjoy!

 

 

Breakfast is the first meal taken after rising from a night’s sleep, most often eaten in the early morning before undertaking the day’s work.[1] Among English speakers, “breakfast” can be used to refer to this meal or to refer to a meal composed of traditional breakfast foods (such as eggs, oatmeal and sausage) served at any time of day. The word literally refers to breaking the fasting period of the prior night.[2]

Breakfast foods vary widely from place to place, but often include a carbohydrate such as grains or cereals, fruit and/or vegetables, a protein food such as eggs, meat or fish, and a beverage such as tea, coffee, milk or fruit juice. Coffee, milk, tea, juice, breakfast cereals, pancakes, sausages, French toast, bacon, sweet breads, fresh fruit, vegetables, eggs, mushrooms, baked beans, muffins, crumpets and toast with butter or margarine and/or jam or marmalade are common examples of breakfast foods, though a large range of preparations and ingredients are associated with breakfast globally.[3]

Some nutritional experts have long referred to breakfast as the most important meal of the day, citing studies that find that people who skip breakfast are disproportionately likely to have problems with concentration, metabolism, weight, and cardiac health.[4][5][6] The nutritionist Monica Reinagel has argued the metabolic benefits have been exaggerated, noting the improvement in cognition has been found among children, but is much less significant among adults. Reinagel also explains that the link between skipping breakfast and increased weight is likely behavioral—compensating with snacks and/or eating more later—and therefore not inevitable.[7] Some say that skipping breakfast may even lead to diabetes as well as coronary disease.[8]

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breakfast

VitaSoul – Swami Sivananda

“This world is your best teacher. There is a lesson in everything. There is a lesson in each experience. Learn it and become wise. Every failure is a stepping stone to success. Every difficulty or disappointment is a trial of your faith. Every unpleasant incident or temptation is a test of your inner strength. Therefore nil desperandum. March forward hero!” ~ Swami Sivananda (1887-1963); Spiritual leader, author, physician

TED Talk Tuesday – Manu Prakash: A 50-cent Microscope that Folds like Origami

When I first saw this in my inbox I thought, “yeah, okay this is a joke.” When I saw it a second time I thought, “I should probably take a look at this.” And I am glad I did. I am very comfortable saying that this idea is brilliant. A folding, paper based, field proof microscope that could potentially save the lives of millions of people….I’m in love. This is a quick talk that is sure to leave you in awe of the capabilities of the human mind. Enjoy!

VitaSoul – Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi

“Keep your thoughts positive because your thoughts become your words. Keep your words positive because your words become your behavior. Keep your behavior positive because your behavior becomes your habits. Keep your habits positive because your habits become your values. Keep your values positive because your values become your destiny.” ~ Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (1869-1948); Indian political and spiritual leader

VitaSoul – Osho

“Sadness gives depth. Happiness gives height. Sadness gives roots. Happiness gives branches. Happiness is like a tree going into the sky, and sadness is like the roots going down into the womb of the earth. Both are needed, and the higher a tree goes, the deeper it goes, simultaneously. The bigger the tree, the bigger will be its roots. In fact, it is always in proportion. That’s its balance.” ~ Osho (born 1931); Indian spiritual teacher

TED Talk Tuesday – Elizabeth Gilbert: Your elusive creative genius

You will know this speaker from her very popular book, Eat, Pray, Love. In this talk, Elizabeth Gilbert discusses the perils of pursuing a creative career and how an artist could avoid those pitfalls. “You know, I think that allowing somebody, one mere person to believe that he or she is like, the vessel, you know, like the font and the essence and the source of all divine, creative, unknowable, eternal mystery is just a smidge too much responsibility to put on one fragile, human psyche.” She suggest that by changing the way we view creative expression and genius, as a gift rather than an innate talent, we can save artists the torment and strain of creativity.

Such a great talk given with tremendous zeal. Makes me long for a creative passion. Enjoy!

Is it logical that anybody should be expected to be afraid of the work that they feel they were put on this Earth to do. And what is it specifically about creative ventures that seems to make us really nervous about each other’s mental health in a way that other careers kind of don’t do, you know?

And so, the question becomes, how? And so, it seems to me, upon a lot of reflection, that the way that I have to work now, in order to continue writing, is that I have to create some sort of protective psychological construct, right? I have to sort of find some way to have a safe distance between me, as I am writing, and my very natural anxiety about what the reaction to that writing is going to be, from now on.

And I got to tell you, I think that was a huge error. You know, I think that allowing somebody, one mere person to believe that he or she is like, the vessel, you know, like the font and the essence and the source of all divine, creative, unknowable, eternal mystery is just a smidge too much responsibility to put on one fragile, human psyche. It’s like asking somebody to swallow the sun. It just completely warps and distorts egos, and it creates all these unmanageable expectations about performance. And I think the pressure of that has been killing off our artists for the last 500 years.

But then he got older, he got calmer, and one day he was driving down the freeway in Los Angeles he told me, and this is when it all changed for him. And he’s speeding along, and all of a sudden he hears this little fragment of melody, that comes into his head as inspiration often comes, elusive and tantalizing, and he wants it, you know, it’s gorgeous, and he longs for it, but he has no way to get it. He doesn’t have a piece of paper, he doesn’t have a pencil, he doesn’t have a tape recorder.

So he starts to feel all of that old anxiety start to rise in him like, “I’m going to lose this thing,and then I’m going to be haunted by this song forever. I’m not good enough, and I can’t do it.” And instead of panicking, he just stopped. He just stopped that whole mental processand he did something completely novel. He just looked up at the sky, and he said, “Excuse me, can you not see that I’m driving?” (Laughter) “Do I look like I can write down a song right now? If you really want to exist, come back at a more opportune moment when I can take care of you. Otherwise, go bother somebody else today. Go bother Leonard Cohen.”

But, the tricky bit comes the next morning, for the dancer himself, when he wakes up and discovers that it’s Tuesday at 11 a.m., and he’s no longer a glimpse of God. He’s just an aging mortal with really bad knees, and maybe he’s never going to ascend to that height again. And maybe nobody will ever chant God’s name again as he spins, and what is he then to do with the rest of his life? This is hard. This is one of the most painful reconciliations to make in a creative life. But maybe it doesn’t have to be quite so full of anguish if you never happened to believe, in the first place, that the most extraordinary aspects of your being came from you. But maybe if you just believed that they were on loan to you from some unimaginable source for some exquisite portion of your life to be passed along when you’re finished, with somebody else. And, you know, if we think about it this way it starts to change everything.

This is how I’ve started to think, and this is certainly how I’ve been thinking in the last few months as I’ve been working on the book that will soon be published, as the dangerously, frighteningly over-anticipated follow up to my freakish success.

And what I have to, sort of keep telling myself when I get really psyched out about that, is, don’t be afraid. Don’t be daunted. Just do your job. Continue to show up for your piece of it, whatever that might be. If your job is to dance, do your dance. If the divine, cockeyed genius assigned to your case decides to let some sort of wonderment be glimpsed, for just one moment through your efforts, then “Olé!” And if not, do your dance anyhow. And “Olé!” to you, nonetheless. I believe this and I feel that we must teach it. “Olé!” to you, nonetheless,just for having the sheer human love and stubbornness to keep showing up.