The Muppets Go All English In This Epic Christmas Commercial ~ Lee Moran

 

You’ve never seen The Muppets like this.

The entire zany gang took over a crumpet factory in Bolton, northern England, to star in what’s been voted the best Christmas commercial across the pond.

The 2-minute clip starts with Kermit the Frog pitching “The Giant Crumpet Show” musical to British baking company Warburtons’ chairman, Jonathan Warburton.

CREDIT: WARBURTONS

The characters then attempt to convince him, through a reworked version of “The Muppet Show” song and dance, into investing in their idea.

They make countless local references, including to British soap opera Coronation Street and the Arndale shopping mall in Manchester.

Even Miss Piggy tries to wow the business’ boss with her charms.

CREDIT: WARBURTONS

The commercial, which first aired in November, was part of a $40 million campaignto celebrate the launch of Warburtons’ new “Giant Crumpet” range, according to Prolific North.

Consumers had voted it this year’s best Christmas commercial, independent brand researcher Millward Brown told the Telegraph Friday.

It beat British grocery giant Sainsbury’s, department store John Lewis and online payment company Paypal to the title.

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/the-muppets-go-all-english-in-this-epic-christmas-commercial_566d84ede4b011b83a6b91f0?cps=gravity_5059_-505184789202106823

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Cookie Monster Is The Life Coach You Never Knew You Needed ~ Ali Velez

Cookie Monster is a great life coach who really listens to his clients.

Cookie Monster Is The Life Coach You Never Knew You Needed
PBS / Via youtube.com

He knows how to relate to what they’re going through.

Cookie Monster Is The Life Coach You Never Knew You Needed
PBS / Via youtube.com

No matter what the problem is…

Cookie Monster Is The Life Coach You Never Knew You Needed
PBS / Via youtube.com

He will try to find something positive in the negative.

Cookie Monster Is The Life Coach You Never Knew You Needed
PBS / Via youtube.com

When all seems hopeless, he helps you find your passion…

Cookie Monster Is The Life Coach You Never Knew You Needed
PBS / Via youtube.com

And provides the perfect comfort.

Cookie Monster Is The Life Coach You Never Knew You Needed
PBS / Via youtube.com

What are you doing with your life? Listen to Cookie Monster! This is all the life advice you will ever need:

Cookie Monster Is The Life Coach You Never Knew You Needed
PBS / Via youtube.com

 

http://www.buzzfeed.com/alivelez/cookie-monster-is-the-life-coach-you-never-knew-you-needed#.gf9Lag0Awp

The Look of Joy! by Kiki Cinza

We don’t need to know everything. In fact, I think it is in the mystery where we experience the most growth. There was a time in my life when I thought I had plateaued in my knowledge. It sounds completely ridiculous to say that now, but there was a time. Of course, that facade came crashing down around me and I learned a lot about myself and that I am not always the pillar of peace. I was livid when it all happened and had very violent fantasies involving nudity, a wolf, a stick, and destruction. When I told my friends about them, they laughed and made jokes about fairies dying when I got angry. Gotta love your friends! It was sobering, jokes included, but it helped me find my true voice. It dared me to be okay with being a perpetual student and I accepted the position.

I recently had a conversation with a nice fella and I asked him what joy looked like. He said plenty, but never answered my question. I even gave examples emphasizing sight. He mentioned how joy is different to each person, he described contentment, the nature of joy, he vaguely mentioned something about a desirable image, but he still didn’t tell me what joy looked like to him. The key verb was look and the most important subject of the verb was “you”, but he didn’t seem to pick up on that. In many ways, I understood. I have been in that kind of hot seat before. I took a spiritual business class and the teacher asked each of us, “What is time?” No one could really answer the question. I remember hearing everyone’s explanation of time and each time they got shot down. It was my turn and I tried to answer the question. Eventually I simply said that I didn’t know…and I really didn’t. I was lauded for my honest answer. My whole mind was twisted and no matter how I tried, I couldn’t find the answer. I later learned that what she was saying was if you can’t really define time, why worry about it. She wanted us to define our moments, for ourselves, without the pressure of time.

Without realizing it, my line of questioning was similar. I asked him this because in our conversation I realized the importance of knowing what joy looks like to us and embodying it. It has been said that we are spiritual beings having a human experience and I fully agree with that. I know that who I am is spiritual (or non-physical). I am that mystery. I also recognize that I came here to have a physical experience and because I do, it can’t be negated when it comes to understanding things like love, joy, and pain. Pain has a look. Love has an appearance and so does joy. Joy has a taste, a smell; it is a feeling. So why did I ask this fella what joy looked like to him?

Truthfully, it was because in all of his pictures that I saw, I only saw one that exuded pure joy. His other pictures had glimpses, but this one was different. It was an older picture of him. He looked relaxed, comfortable, even a little bashful, but joyful. I also noticed that was the picture he seemed to criticize the most. I used to be embarrassed about the pictures of myself that showed all of my gums. When the joy pours out, my gums like to make a showy appearance. So when I asked him the question, I was asking if he could recognize the moments when he exuded his joy. I was wondering if he liked what it looked like when it showed up. Did he like how he was expressing himself? I remember being so joyful in middle school the day I wore my magenta pants inside out paired with yet another original hairstyle I made up the night before.  I enjoyed expressing myself even if there wasn’t a rhyme or reason to it. Of course, he may say he wasn’t joyful at all during that time, but that isn’t important to me. It is more important that we all take the time to decide what joy looks like to us and find the ways, circumstances, states of being where it resides and exude it.

Too often we walk around with a serious face. I know I have been guilty of that. During my first year in college, my scowl was a main topic of my concerned professors. I was even pulled into an office about it. They wanted to know what was wrong with me. I was intimidated by the environment because I had never seen that many intelligent people in one place before even though you couldn’t get me to admit it. My sour face was a protection mechanism. Later a different professor and random people on the street taught me the power of my smile and exuding my joy. Joy has changed my life. Sure pain is a part of life, but joy trumps it over and over if you let it. I say, let it pour out into everything you do.

Love, joy and pain are constantly unfolding  their truth to us. There definition is never static so it doesn’t make sense to claim dominion over them. Be the student of the present and watch the mystery reveal itself. Love guides it all. So I ask you, my readers, what does joy look like to you? Are you willing to commit to living in it and oozing it out from your heart? In the extremely modified NYC Homeland security slogan, If you see something called joy, show it to the world! <—— That is where your true power lies…

Special thanks goes to everyone who helped me write this post past, present, physical, and non-physical. You know who you are…

Really…What does joy look like to you?

Walk a Mile in My Heels By Katherine McAllister

When I was a kid, being a girl meant dressing up in pretty clothes, painting my nails, occasionally trying on my mother’s make up and high heels, and waiting for my inevitable boobs to come in.  Years later, I’m 23, and I still dress up, I have my own make-up rather than having to steal my mothers, and the boobs have arrived, well sort of.  But while growing up, never did it cross my mind, that one day being a girl would mean having to defend myself from a potential government that wants to take my rights away.  I grew up learning about all the women through history that already fought these battles whether it was at the Seneca Falls Convention or the pivotal outcome of Roe v Wade.  I appreciated these women for putting themselves on the line to pave the way for fellow and future women.  I looked up to them for their strength and bravery to say, “We are women, and we are just as important so deal with it.” But never did I think that the battles already won by the women from history, would become my battles in the present.  Never did I think that I would have to step up to the plate and say “Stay away from my uterus!”  And yet here we are, living in 2012, and still fighting for our rights and our bodies.

It is election year and with that comes contentious debates, but this year it also brings a new grouping of people who wish to take away rights from women and lessen our value in this country.

The men in power who attack women, and then insist they care for us should think carefully before they speak.  When you tell me that rape is just “another method of conception,” you clearly don’t care about me Mr. Paul Ryan (http://www.outsidethebeltway.com/paul-ryan-rape-just-another-method-of-conception/).  When you tell me, that you want to defund planned parenthood, a safe haven for many girls to go to when they are pregnant and lost or simply need a form of birth control, you don’t care about me Mr. Mitt Romney  (http ://www.huffingtonpost. com/2012/03/13/mitt-romney-planned-parenthood_n_1343450.html).  When you tell me, that if I were raped I should “make lemonade out of lemons” Mr. Santorum, you don’t care about me (http://www.indecisionforever.com/blog/2012/01/25/rick-santorum-tells-rape-victims-to-make-lemons-out-of-lemonade).  When you tell me that “If it’s a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down” you not only don’t care about me Mr. Akin, but you have a warped sense of reality and endanger all women to fall prey to those who can say they didn’t rape us legitimately (http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2012/08/22/todd-akin-s-legitimate-rape-timing-couldn-t-be-worse-for-republicans.html).  To all the men in power, power of any kind, who find themselves arrogant enough to even think they can speak for women and their bodies, if you have proven not to care about me, why should I go to the voting booth and care about you?

How would you men feel if Viagra could no longer be made available?  I mean it’s covered by insurance, but, let’s face it, what woman with all these restrictions you’ve all placed on her, would want to have sex at all? So if we don’t want to have sex with you, kind of pointless to help your penis, no?  If our forms of birth control are going to stop being covered, shouldn’t yours?  What about vasectomies?  I mean, if Mr. Romney wants to defund Planned Parenthood and take away women’s resources of not only not getting pregnant but not contracting diseases, then, isn’t it only fair we take away another form of your birth control?  Isn’t a vasectomy just “murdering” your chances of having a child?  What if we placed a ban on masturbation?  I mean, isn’t that right there just a waste of a possible life? Sure you’re just having fun but that’s viable DNA being thrown out right there.  If women are considered pregnant two weeks prior to conception in Arizona (in other words, every time a woman has sex she’s considered pregnant), isn’t it only fair that you too have to rid yourself of any sexual activity that doesn’t involve procreation?

If these scenarios seem ridiculous to you, it’s because they are.  But with such a preposterous line of arguments against women, it seems fitting to offer up an equally preposterous line of solutions for men.

This country was built on the idea that we are all created equal.  And if I have to stand up and fight all over again on issues that shouldn’t even be brought up, then I will.  I am no longer a little girl.  Today I am a woman.  And you know what, Mr. Romney, Mr. Ryan, Mr. Akin, Mr. Santorum, and every other “Mr.” out there who’s arrogant enough to speak for women, don’t you dare judge, condemn, or even attempt to speak for women on anything unless you have walked a mile in their heels.

Keep your minds on helping the country and away from imprisoning our uteruses.

 About The Author – Hey my name’s Katie McAllister. I’m a college graduate in NYC, owner of my little dogs Goliath Apollo Creed and Thor Van Damme, lover of Mac n Cheese(from the Kraft blue box especially), always one to take a spin in a revolving door than to walk through the regular door, and has already earned my masters in couch potato-ing with movies and TV. I grew up in a tiny town in upstate New York.  And while I can appreciate that atmosphere I knew it was never for me.  I was looking for excitement and I was looking to be a part of it.  So I got my grades, graduated high school, and took a train to come live in Manhattan.  I stepped out of Grand Central and immediately I was Dorothy Gale with my ruby slippers and all; in Manhattan I had left my Kansas and I had found my “Oz.”As I’ve gotten older I have realized the power of my voice, the power in all our voices actually.  Now that could be because I come from a very loud family but it’s also in large part due to what I see occurring around me. Too often SILENCE has contributed to a stagnant lifestyle with no changes in sight;  something that can be used as an excuse for politeness when let’s face it, there’s nothing polite about keeping quiet when something is wrong in the world. So here I am, not hushing or keeping it down, and letting my voice carry on just about anything: food, movies, tv, politics, or even mac n cheese. I have a passion for writing, especially when it comes to injustices in the world.  I never appreciated the “quiet” of things in life. I was always loud, talkative, and noisy from the time I was five years old right up until the present at 23 years old.  When it comes to important issues in our world, let’s face it, silence is overrated.