21 Insane Ways To Start Your Day With Eggs ~ B. Britnell

1. Breakfast Quesadillas

Breakfast Quesadillas

B. Britnell / Via bbritnell.com

Find the recipe HERE.

2. Breakfast Pizza with Kale Pesto

Breakfast Pizza with Kale Pesto

Pinch of Yum / Via pinchofyum.com

Find the recipe HERE.

3. Avocado Bacon & Eggs

Avocado Bacon & Eggs

Lil’ Luna / Via lilluna.com

Find the recipe HERE.

4. Bacon, Egg, and Cheese Biscuit Braid

Bacon, Egg, and Cheese Biscuit Braid

Melissa’s Southern Style Kitchen / Via melissassouthernstylekitchen.com

Find the recipe HERE.

5. Breakfast Tacos

Breakfast Tacos

B. Britnell / Via bbritnell.com

Find the recipe HERE.

6. Carnitas Chilaquiles with Whipped Jalapeno Cream

Carnitas Chilaquiles with Whipped Jalapeno Cream

Half Baked Harvest / Via halfbakedharvest.com

Find the recipe HERE.

7. Italian Baked Eggs

Italian Baked Eggs

Damn Delicious / Via damndelicious.net

Find the recipe HERE.

8. Red Potato Skillet Hash

Red Potato Skillet Hash

B. Britnell / Via bbritnell.com

Find the recipe HERE.

9. Breakfast Enchiladas

Breakfast Enchiladas

Pinch of Yum / Via pinchofyum.com

Find the recipe HERE.

10. Avocado Toast with Egg

Avocado Toast with Egg

Skinny Taste / Via skinnytaste.com

Find the recipe HERE.

11. Bacon & Egg Breakfast Muffins

Bacon & Egg Breakfast Muffins

Recipe Tin Eats / Via recipetineats.com

Find the recipe HERE.

12. Scotch Eggs

Scotch Eggs

Well Worn Fork / Via wellwornfork.com

Find the recipe HERE.

13. Cheesy Baked Egg Toast

Cheesy Baked Egg Toast

Crazy Adventues in Parenting / Via crazyadventuresinparenting.com

Find the recipe HERE.

14. Savory Breakfast Crepes

Savory Breakfast Crepes

B. Britnell / Via bbritnell.com

Find the recipe HERE.

15. Breakfast Bahn Mi

Breakfast Bahn Mi

Cooking and Beer / Via cookingandbeer.com

Find the recipe HERE.

16. Baked Egg Boats

Baked Egg Boats

The Kitchenarium / Via thekitchenarium.com

Find the recipe HERE.

17. Jalapeno Cheddar Grits with Poached Eggs

Jalapeno Cheddar Grits with Poached Eggs

Little Spice Jar / Via littlespicejar.com

Find the recipe HERE.

18. Breakfast Burrito Bowl

Breakfast Burrito Bowl

Skinny Taste / Via skinnytaste.com

Find the recipe HERE.

19. Breakfast Bake

Breakfast Bake

B. Britnell / Via bbritnell.com

Find the recipe HERE.

20. Baked Eggs Skillet

Baked Eggs Skillet

Kalyn’s Kitchen / Via kalynskitchen.com

Find the recipe HERE.

21. Egg Breakfast Muffins

Egg Breakfast Muffins

Hurry the Food Up / Via hurrythefoodup.com

Recipe found HERE.

 

 

http://www.buzzfeed.com/britafoti/21-creative-ways-to-eat-eggs-for-breakfast-sizq#.pj4n233yw

Best Vegetarian Sources of Complete Protein ~ Eat This Not That

By Dana Leigh Smith

With the ever-growing popularity of protein shakes and half-pound burgers, there’s no denying that our culture is obsessed with consuming protein. So it shouldn’t come as a surprise that vegans and vegetarians are constantly questioned about going meat-free—despite the fact that neither diet by definition is low-protein.

If you’re vegan or vegetarian, you know exactly what we’re talking about — and you’re tired of getting asked questions about the sources and quantity of your protein intake. Here’s what you need to know: Incomplete proteins — like whole grains, nuts and produce — can join together and produce a complete protein, packed with all nine essential amino acids the body cannot produce on its own, so as long as you consume various sources of them throughout the day they. 

Even so, the easiest way to ward off protein deficiency is to eat complete sources of the nutrient and, thankfully, there are plenty of vegan- and vegetarian-friendly options. To help you stay healthy and strong, we’ve compiled a list of the best complete proteins for weight loss below. Incorporating them into your diet will ward off symptoms of protein deficiency—like low blood sugar and weakness—and fuel that flat belly fire!

1. Chia Seedschia seeds

Protein, per tablespoon: 2.5 grams

Though chia seeds don’t contain that much protein, they do contain all nine essential amino acids. Thanks to the seeds’ blood-sugar stabilizing ratio of satiating protein, fats and fiber, they’re the perfect hunger-busting addition to your diet, and can help you lose inches. But that’s not all: ALAs, the specific type of omega-3s found in chia seeds, can decrease the risk of heart disease, according to a Pennsylvania State University study. 

Eat This! Add chia seeds to yogurt or a homemade vegan smoothie to keep your energy levels up all morning long.

2. Soybeans& Soy Products

edamame

Protein, per ½ cup: 2-21 grams

So many ways to eat soybeans, so little time! To get the most bang for your buck, make tempeh, a traditional Indonesian fermented soy product, part of your weekly lineup. A mere half-cup of the stuff packs in 21 grams of protein. Another solid bet: dry roasted soybeans. With a half-cup serving up a whopping 18 grams of protein, it’s one of the best high-protein snacks around. Steamed soybeans (4 g protein/0.5 cup), tofu (10 g protein/0.5 cup) and soymilk (2 g protein/0.5 cup) also provide a solid hit of complete proteins and magnesium, a mineral that’s essential to muscle development, energy production and carb metabolism.

Eat This! Eat roasted soybeans solo as an on-the-go snack, or add them to homemade trail mixes. Slice and pan-fry tempeh and use it in lieu of meat on a sandwich, order edamame (steamed soybeans) as an appetizer next time you’re at a Japanese restaurant, or add soymilk to your overnight oats.

3. Hemp Seed

hemp seeds

Protein, per tablespoon: 3.3 grams

The hemp seed — marijuana’s edible, non-intoxicating cousin — is gaining recognition as a nutritional rock star—and for good reason. Studies suggest that hemp seeds can fight heart disease, obesity and metabolic syndrome, likely because they’re rich in fiber and omega-3s.

Eat This! Simply sprinkle the hemp seeds into salads and cereals, or add hemp protein powder to your post-workout shake. Protein bars packed with the seed have recently hit supermarkets, so you might want to give those a try, too.

4. Quinoa

quinoa

Protein, per ½ cup: 4 grams

With more than 1,400 quinoa products currently on the market, it’s safe to say that the ancient grain is here to stay. Quinoa is higher in protein than most other grains, packs a hefty dose of heart-healthy unsaturated fats and is also a great source of fiber, a nutrient that can help you feel fuller, longer. It gets better: The mild-tasting grain is also a good source of the amino acid L-arginine, which has been shown to promote muscle over fat gain in animal studies, explains Gina Consalvo, RD, LDN, Eat Well with Gina. Though we can’t be sure findings will hold true in people, it can’t hurt to add more of this healthy grain to your plate.

Eat This! Pair quinoa with veggies beans to create a well-balanced meal, use the grain to make a veggie burger or up the flavor and nutrient-content of a green salad with a scoop.

5. Ezekiel Bread

sprouted bread

Protein, per slice: 4 grams

“Made with sprouted grains, wheat, barley, beans, lentils, millet and spelt, Ezekiel Bread contains 18 amino acids — including all of the nine essential amino acids,” says Consalvo. That’s something most other bread products can’t claim. Making this your go-to sandwich base ensures you get at least 8 grams of complete proteins every time you sit down to lunch.

Eat This! Use Ezekiel Bread any way you’d use traditional bread; it’s extremely versatile. (That’s just one of the reasons why we named it one of our favorite healthy breads.)

6. Amaranth

amaranth

Protein, per ½ cup: 4.67 grams

Quinoa isn’t the only “ancient grain” that comes loaded with health perks. Amaranth, a naturally gluten-free seed, is a good source of digestion-aiding fiber, as well as calcium and bicep-building iron.

Eat This! Amaranth takes on a porridge-like texture when cooked, making it a great alternative breakfast option. Whip up a batch and be sure to top off your bowl with some tasty, nutrient-packed oatmeal toppings—they work well in all types of hot cereals, including porridge.

7. Eggs

eggs

Protein, per egg: 6 grams

With 6 grams of protein a pop, eggs are an ideal food for vegetarians and omnivores alike who want to stay swimsuit-ready all year round. Their protein fuels your muscles, boosts metabolismand keeps hunger under control, aiding weight loss. Eggs are also one of the most nutrient-filled vegetarian protein sources around. “Eggs contain a host of health-promoting and flat-belly nutrients including choline, a major fat-burning nutrient that also plays an important role in brain health,” says Consalvo.

Eat This! Eggs can anchor a breakfast, slide into a sandwich at lunch, beef up a dinnertime salad, or even serve as a protein-filled snack on their own. 

8. Hummus

hummus

Protein, per tablespoon: 1.1 grams

“Garbanzo beans are high in lysine, and tahini is a rich source of the amino acid methionine. Individually these foods are incomplete proteins, but when you combine the two together to make hummus, they create a complete protein,” explains Consalvo. Just be aware that not all store-bought hummus brands contain tahini. One that does:  Pacific Foods Organic Classic Hummus. It’s not only tahini-infused, but also shelf-stable, making it ideal for on-the-go snacking.

Eat This! Spread hummus onto sandwiches in lieu of mustard, mayo and other spreads, or use it as a dip for raw veggies. 

9. Buckwheat

buckwheat

Protein, per ½ cup, cooked: 3 grams

Every half-cup serving of this gluten-free seed packs three grams of protein, two grams of belly-flattening fiber (which is more than you’ll find in oatmeal) and half the day’s magnesium, a mineral that’s essential to muscle development and carb metabolism. What’s more, a 2013 study in the Journal of Nutrition found that higher magnesium intake was associated with lower levels of fasting glucose and insulin, markers related to fat and weight gain. Fill up your plate with the nutritional powerhouse to maintain your flat stomach.

Eat This! Add buckwheat-based Japanese soba noodles to stir-fries or whip up these savory buckwheat pancakes—the tomato avocado salsa with which it’s paired is overflowing with flavors you’re sure to love.

10. Spinach

Protein Payout: 1 cup (cooked), 41 calories, 5 grams of protein One cup of spinach has almost as much protein as a hard-boiled egg—for half the calories! Maximize its nutrition by steaming spinach instead of eating it raw: That helps retain vitamins and facilitate absorption of calcium. Believe it or not, spinach is one of the 10 greens healthier for you than kale.

11. Sun-Dried Tomatoes

best high protein foods for weight loss - sun dried tomatoes

Protein Payout: 1 cup, 139 calories, 6 g protein Tomatoes are brimming with lycopene, an antioxidant which studies show can decrease your risk of bladder, lung, prostate, skin, and stomach cancers, and reduce your chances of developing coronary artery disease. They’re also rich in fiber and contain ¾ of your RDA of potassium, which is essential for heart health and tissue repair. 

12. Guava

best high protein foods for weight loss - guava

Protein Payout: 1 cup, 112 calories, 4.2 g protein The tropical highest-protein fruit, guava packs more than 4 grams per cup, along with 9 grams of fiber and only 112 calories. With 600% of your DV of Vitamin C per cup — the equivalent of more than seven medium oranges! — it should merengue its way into your shopping cart ASAP. And while you’re at the store, be sure to pick up some of these other surprising high-protein foods.

13. Artichokes

best high protein foods for weight loss - artichokes

Protein Payout: 1 medium vegetable, 60 calories, 4.2 g protein Eating foods high in protein and fiber are key to turning off your body’s hunger hormones. The artichoke is a double winner: It has almost twice as much fiber as kale (10.3 g per medium artichoke, or 40% of the daily fiber the average woman needs) and one of the highest protein counts among vegetables. 

14. Peas

best high protein foods for weight loss - peas

Protein Payout: 1 cup, 118 calories, 8 g protein

It’s enough to make Popeye do a spit take: Peas might seem wimpy, but one cup contains eight times the protein of a cup of spinach. And with almost 100% of your daily value of vitamin C in a single cup, they’ll help keep your immune system in tip-top shape.

15. Beans

Protein Payout: 1/2 cup, 109-148 calories, 7-10 grams of protein Not only are beans rich in protein and nutrients that benefit your heart, brain and muscles, they digest slowly, helping you feel fuller longer. They’re a weight-loss superfood you should eat daily.

16. Lentils

Protein Payout: 1 cup, 230 calories, 18 g protein If you’re an anti-meathead, you should warm up to lentils ASAP. One cup has the protein of three eggs, with less than one gram of fat! Their high fiber content makes them extremely satiating, and studies have shown that they speed fat loss: Spanish researchers found that people whose diets included four weekly servings of legumes lost more weight and improved their cholesterol more than people who didn’t. 

17. Peanut Butter

Protein Payout: 2 tablespoons, 191 calories, 7 grams of protein Although eating too much peanut butter can widen your waist, a standard two-tablespoon serving provides a solid dose of muscle-building protein and healthy fats. According to a 2014 study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, consuming peanuts can prevent both cardiovascular and coronary artery disease — the most common type of heart condition. Look for the unsalted, no sugar added varieties without hydrogenated oils to reap the most benefits.

18. Sprouted Whole Grain Bread

Protein payout: Two slices, 138-220 calories, 8-12 g protein
Not all breads are carb bombs waiting to shatter your weight-loss goals. This nutrient-dense bread is loaded with folate-filled lentils, protein and good-for-you grains and seeds like barley and millet.

19. Teff

Protein Payout: 1/4 cup, 180 calories, 7 grams of protein This obscure grain is ready for its close-up, and it’ll help your beach body get there too. It’s rich in essential amino acids, calcium and vitamin C — a nutrient not typically found in grains. To reap the benefits, trade your morning oatmeal in for a protein-packed teff porridge, or cook it up as a side dish anytime you’d usually go for quinoa or rice.

20. Gruyére Cheese

Protein Payout: 1 oz, 117 calories, 8 g protein Here’s an excuse for a wine-and-cheese hour: The schmancy Swiss cheese (don’t forget the accented ‘e’) contains 30% more protein than an egg in one slice, plus one-third of your RDA of vitamin A. If you’re looking to indulge, keep your serving to the size of four dice, and moderate your vino to one glass for women, two glasses for men, to get the bad-cholesterol-lowering benefits of the antioxidant resveratrol. And better yet, stick to the #1 wine for rapid weight loss.

21. 2% Greek Yogurt

Protein Payout: 7 oz, 150 calories, 20 g protein If you’re looking to lose weight and/or build muscle, yogurt should be a staple in your diet. A study printed in the Journal of Nutrition found that probiotics like the ones found in yogurt helped obese women lose nearly twice the weight compared to those who did not consume probiotics. Choose wisely: Skip over low-fat and fat-free — they’re skimmed of nutrients and satiating power — and flavored yogurts, which can contain almost as much sugar as a dessert. Choose a brand from our exclusive guide to the best brand name yogurts for weight loss.

22. 1% Organic, Grass-Fed Milk

Protein Payout: 8 oz, 110 calories, 8 g protein
Milk is one of the foods you should always buy organic. Organically raised cows aren’t given the same hormones and antibiotics that conventional cows are, and grass-fed cows have been shown to have higher levels of good omega-3 fatty acids and two to five times more lean-muscle building CLA (conjugated linoleic acid) than their corn- and grain-fed counterparts. Although skim milk is low-cal, many vitamins are fat-soluble, which means you’re cheating yourself out of their benefits unless you opt for at least 1%.

23. Shelled Pumpkin Seeds

Protein Payout: 1 oz, 158 calories, 9 g protein If you only think of pumpkin seeds as gourd guts, you’re in for a literal treat. They contain energy-boosting magnesium, phosphorus and zinc. Throw them into salads and rice dishes or eat them raw. Want more delectable ways to eat pumpkin? Check out these 8 amazing ways to eat pumpkin!

24. Almonds

best high protein foods for weight loss - almonds

Protein Payout: 1 oz, 164 calories, 6 g protein Think of almonds as a natural weight-loss pill. A study of overweight and obese adults found that, combined with a calorie-restricted diet, consuming a little more than a quarter-cup of the nuts can decrease weight more effectively than a snack of complex carbohydrates and safflower oil—after just two weeks! (And after 24 weeks, those who ate the nuts experienced a 62% greater reduction in weight and BMI!) Eat your daily serving before you hit the gym: Beause they’re rich in the amino acid L-arginine, almonds can help you burn more fat and carbs during workouts, according to a study printed in The Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition.

25. Cashews

Protein Payout: 1 oz, 157 calories, 5 g protein You probably know that almonds are a great go-to snack, but you should mix cashews into the rotation. They’re a good source of magnesium — which helps your body relieve constipation, boosts the immune system and supports cognitive function — and biotin, which helps keep your hair and nails healthy.

26. Banza Pasta

Protein payout: 14 grams per serving This delicious pasta, made with chickpeas, has double the protein and half the carbs of traditional noodles. It also has 8 grams of fiber and 30% of your iron RDA per serving.

27. Tempeh

Protein payout: 16 grams per ½ cup In your quest for a muscle-building vegetarian entree, you don’t have to swap meat for man boobs. Tofu contains soy milk, which can lead to increased estrogen levels and the need for an over-the-shoulder boulder holder. But tempeh is made from soy beans, making it close to a whole food. It also keeps more of its protein—about 50% more than tofu.

28. Vegan Protein Powder

Protein payout: 15 to 20 grams per scoop Eating veggies—and supplementing with vegan protein powder shakes—is one of the best ways to burn fat. A study in Nutrition Journal found that “plant protein intakes may play a role in preventing obesity.” We love Vega One All-in-One Nutritional Shake, Vega Sport Performance Protein, and Sunwarrior Warrior Blend.

29. Triticale

Protein Payout: 1/4 cup, 161 calories, 6 grams of protein While you may have never heard of this hearty whole grain before, it may become your new favorite. This wheat-rye hybrid packs 12 grams of protein per half cup, and is also rich in brain-boosting iron, bloat-busting potassium, magnesium and heart-healthy fiber. Use triticale berries in place of rice and mix it with soy sauce, fresh ginger, cloves, shiitake mushrooms and edamame to make a healthy, Asian-inspired dish. If you prefer to firing up the oven to using the stove, use triticale flour in place of traditional flour in your baking.

30. Peanuts

Protein payout: 9 grams per ¼ cup
Sometimes you feel like a nut — and even if you don’t, this protein powerhouse should be part of any plant-based diet. Peanuts have more protein than pecans (2.5 grams), cashews (5 grams) and even almonds (8 grams). They’re also rich in folate, which is great for your mood, heart and colon.

 

http://news.yahoo.com/best-vegetarian-sources-complete-protein-181612127.html#

How to Get Abs—Without Ever Doing One Sit-Up ~ Eat This, Not That!

By celebrity trainer Mark Langowski, author, Eat This, Not That! for Abs

I haven’t done a sit-up in over a decade, and yet I have a six-pack.

How is this possible?

I realized a long time ago that the largest role in seeing any abdominal definition was diet. The only way get your body fat levels low enough to see muscle definition in your abdomen is by watching what you eat, doing countless hours of cardio, or a combination of both.

Because I don’t have the time or attention span to do any more than 30 minutes of cardio one to three days a week, and only have time for another one to two full body workouts per week, I know my diet has to be on point.

But once my body fat levels are low, how do I sculpt a visible 6 pack?

You would think the answer is: By doing countless sit-ups. WRONG.

I have been a personal trainer for over 13 years—during this time, I have learned a lot about a lot, but the most important topic that I discovered was 10 years ago when I found out how damaging sit-ups are to the discs in my spine. It was after listening to genius professor Stuart McGill, who is head of spine biomechanics at the University of Waterloo, that I realized I had been doing more harm to myself and my clients by having them do traditional sit-ups.

I never relied solely on sit-ups when training myself or my clients, but I did do them.

After listening to McGill, I did my own extensive research and spoke to some of the world’s top spine surgeons, and they all said the same thing: Sit-ups can and will cause disc herniation. Once you flex the spine past approximately 25 degrees, you actually stop using your abdominals as the primary muscle group and start engaging your hips.
When you flex the spine forward past a certain point, you are creating such pressure on the discs in your spine that you are at high risk for a herniation.

A traditional sit-up generates at least 3,350 newtons (the equivalent of 340 kg) of compressive force on the spine. The U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health states that anything above 3,300 newtons is unsafe.

Although kids and adults should both steer away from sit-ups, it is more common to see disc herniations in adults, as the degeneration of the spine has not yet taken place in children. (This doesn’t make sit-ups OK for kids—I advise the families I train against it.)

But without sit-ups, you ask, how can I get a six pack?

With Eat This, Not That! For Abs, I have created an entire workout plan that is meant to get you a rock hard core without involving one single sit-up.

You’ll learn how to train the core in a functional way, keeping the spine healthy. I have seen clients go through back operations from injuries sustained outside of the gym and the process from injury to recovery is painful and grueling. You don’t want to end up under the knife of a spine surgeon; trust me.

Throughout the workout section of the book, I explain how to train the entire body in a way that is activating the core muscles in every exercise you do. A squat may look like a leg exercise, but did you know you are also working your core muscles when done properly? Inside the book, you’ll also get a complete meal plan. Below are my 15 favorite foods that keep my muscles fueled and stomach full!

1. Fish

 

Not only is fish packed with healthy fat, but it is also carb-free and packed with protein.

2. Eggs

The yolks often get bad press, but the yolks provide healthy fat that is needed for brain development! These keep me full and are a great pair with my next favorite food for abs; oats!

3. Oatmeal

The steel cut oats provide your body with the energy it needs to make it through those tough workouts and digests nice and slow into your bloodstream, so you don’t get a spike and crash!

Test panelists got a six pack in less than six weeks! See for yourself on Eat This, Not That! For Abs!

4. Almonds

I love this snack because it is portable and satisfies my hunger when I’m on the road. The healthy fat, protein, and zero carbs make this one of my favorite snacks; don’t forget about the fiber as well!

5. Spinach

So many ways to enjoy this delicious green. Throw it in your morning smoothie, sauté it, or have it in a salad. Either way, you are getting an alphabet full of vitamins and an excellent source of fiber.

6. Beans

Black, white, red; whatever your choice is, make sure you keep these in your diet. These slow digesting carbs will provide you with energy for your day and also give you a great dose of fiber and protein! So complex!

Strip Away Belly Fat—Fast—with Mark’s proven system, Eat This, Not That! For Abs!

7. Dried edamame

If you are on the road like I am, you need go-to snacks that are portable and multifaceted. With edamame, you get a huge dose of fiber, protein, and minimal carbohydrates.

8. Pumpkin seeds

Magnesium, Zinc, and Omega-3’s! Don’t throw these out next Halloween! Make sure you bake them and throw some sea salt on them and enjoy!! These are also great to throw into a trail mix!

9. Olive oil

Become friends with olive oil. You will be using it to cook almost everything with! This healthy fat will help keep your joints lubricated and brain healthy!

Get the ultimate six-pack in six weeks with the brand-new book *Eat This, Not That! For Abs!

10. Quinoa

This grain is one of my favorite foods to accompany a piece of fish with veggies. You don’t need much to fill you up and you can also prepare it in the morning with your eggs. Fiber, good carbs, and protein make this a must-have if you want to stay energized and see your abs.

11. Protein powder

Lets face it, in a perfect world, we would get all of our protein from natural food sources—but it’s hard. Select a powder that fits your dietary needs and stomach tolerance. I choose vegan protein powder, but one option that is great for getting your muscles to recover quickly is whey protein. Casein is also good for bedtime cravings as it will slowly digest while you sleep, steadily fueling your muscles.

12. Avocado

It has the healthy fat that’s great for hair, skin and nails…and tastes delicious! Try it with eggs, in your salad or next to your salmon for dinner.

Test panelists got a six pack in less than six weeks using Eat This, Not That! For Abs!

13. Berries

Strawberries, blackberries, raspberries, blueberries. All of these fruits have a ton of antioxidants, are low in carbs, and high in fiber. Throw them in your morning smoothie!

14. Black Rice

Packed with so many vitamins and has more fiber than regular rice. Did I mention it is delicious.

15. Sweet Potatoes

These will be your new best friend. These low glycemic index carbs will keep your muscles full for your grueling workouts and also provide you a huge dose of vitamins!

https://www.yahoo.com/health/abs-without-ever-doing-one-150851056.html

How To Eat Vegan For A Week And Love It ~ Rachel Sanders

Have you recently realized that you love adorable baby animals too much to eat them? Are you pretty convinced that livestock farming is destroying the world? Do you just want to have something in common with Alicia Silverstone?

MAYBE YOU SHOULD GO VEGAN.

No, seriously. We challenge you to try sticking to a vegan diet—basically, eating nothing made from/by an animal—for a week, whether it’s because you’re seriously considering a lifestyle change or because you know you can rise to that kind of challenge.

Here are the rules:

1. NO MEAT
2. NO DAIRY (milk, cheese, yogurt, etc)
3. NO EGGS

Below you’ll find a week’s worth of really tasty, non-lame recipes to make it easy. The clock starts on a Saturday, so you’ll have time to cook, shop, and get adjusted. You can feel free to come up with your own ideas, too; there’s a very handy list of tips and ingredient swaps over at Vegan Action’s website.

The Shopping List

The Shopping List

For decorative purposes only, please do not actually put milk and eggs and butter on your shopping list.

A few things used in some of these recipes that you might not have:

non-dairy milk: Soy, almond, and coconut milk are all easy to find.
cashew nuts: Ground up, they give sauces and spreads a nice creamy texture.
tofu: Extra firm is the most sturdy and useful type for stir-frying, etc.
panko breadcrumbs: Use them as breading to make food delicious and crispy.
miso: Technically fermented soybean paste but also a magic condiment that makes everything amazing. White miso is the most versatile.
nutritional yeast: It tastes so much like cheese it’s crazy.
Bragg’s Liquid Aminos: Some soy sauces are processed with animal products; a lot of vegan recipes use this instead.

OK, ready?

OK, ready?

Saturday Breakfast: Nutty Cinnamon Quinoa

Saturday Breakfast: Nutty Cinnamon Quinoa

Cook a big pot of your favorite grain (quinoa is yummy and has a lot of protein) and keep it in the fridge. You can rewarm for an easy breakfast through the week, and add whatever fruit or nuts you want. Swap in non-dairy milk for regular; maple syrup on top is nice. Recipe at 101 Cookbooks.

Saturday Lunch or Dinner: Sweet Potato Burgers

Saturday Lunch or Dinner: Sweet Potato Burgers

Roast a few extra sweet potatoes to have on hand for snacking. Recipe from Love & Lemons.

Sunday Breakfast: Easy Weekend Pancakes + Fruit

Sunday Breakfast: Easy Weekend Pancakes + Fruit

Recipe from veganyumyum.

Sunday Lunch

Just because you’re vegan now doesn’t mean you can’t make a mean SANDWICH. If you’re not afraid of a little whisking, you can even DIY some creamy vegan mayo with dijon, lemon, garlic, and olive oil.

Check out this list of 50 ideas, or mix-and-match with some of these fixin’ options: 

hummus
avocado
tomato
fried or scrambled tofu
roasted vegetables (red peppers, eggplant, etc)
pickles
olives
nut butter (Bored of peanut? Try almond.)
jam
bananas

Sunday Dinner: Eggplant Lemongrass Curry

Sunday Dinner: Eggplant Lemongrass Curry

Swap in extra ginger + grated lemon or lime zest if you don’t want to wrastle with lemongrass. Serve with some steamed rice. Recipe at Green Kitchen Stories.

Sunday Dessert: Chocolate Mousse

Sunday Dessert: Chocolate Mousse

Chocolate + Water = MAGIC MOUSSE (for real). Recipe at Food52.

Monday Breakfast

Cereal is still totally fair game. Dip into your quinoa stash from Saturday or just eat your Cheerios with non-dairy milk.

Monday Lunch

Bring leftover eggplant curry from Sunday plus a roasted sweet potato from Saturday.

Monday Dinner: Penne with Veggies & Pine Nuts

Monday Dinner: Penne with Veggies & Pine Nuts

You can use whatever vegetables you have on hand for this. Recipe at Food52.

Tuesday Breakfast

Keep working on that quinoa! Toss in a chopped apple and some brown sugar when you heat it up.

Tuesday Lunch: Avocado & Chickpea Sandwich

Tuesday Lunch: Avocado & Chickpea Sandwich

Recipe at Love & Lemons.

Tuesday Dinner: Miso Vegetables and Tofu

Tuesday Dinner: Miso Vegetables and Tofu

The miso makes this great, so don’t leave it out. Recipe at 101 Cookbooks.

Wednesday Breakfast: PB&B Toast

Wednesday Breakfast: PB&B Toast

Peanut butter and banana slices on nice grainy bread.

Wednesday Lunch

Get some soup! Most places should have a few decent vegan options, like lentil soup or vegetarian chili.

Wednesday Dinner: Warm Butternut & Chickpea Salad

Wednesday Dinner: Warm Butternut & Chickpea Salad

The tahini dressing on this is nice with lots of stuff; add some sauteed greens and pita bread to make a meal. Recipe at Smitten Kitchen.

Thursday Breakfast: Smoothie

Thursday Breakfast: Smoothie

Just pop some berries or any fruit you’ve got in the freezer into a blender and add almond or soy milk and a little agave or maple syrup. Bananas are good for a creamier texture. This Green Apple Smoothie from Girl Makes Food looks nice.

Thursday Lunch: Beet & Chickpea Salad

Thursday Lunch: Beet & Chickpea Salad

Use soy yogurt or hummus instead of regular yogurt for the sauce. Recipe at Love & Lemons.

Thursday Dinner: Jerk Sloppy Joes

Thursday Dinner: Jerk Sloppy Joes

Recipe at Post Punk Kitchen.

Friday Breakfast: Chocolate Peanut Butter Breakfast Bars

Friday Breakfast: Chocolate Peanut Butter Breakfast Bars

Tons of different nuts and seeds in here; you can pretty much throw in whatever you’ve got/whatever you like. Recipe at 86 Lemons.

Friday Lunch: Flatbreads with Scallion & Red Pepper Spread

Friday Lunch: Flatbreads with Scallion & Red Pepper Spread

You can buy flatbreads instead of baking them, unless you’re feeling ambitious. The spread is made with cashews and tofu and would be good on lots of stuff. Recipe at Post Punk Kitchen.

Friday Dinner: Pappardelle With Kale Pesto

Friday Dinner: Pappardelle With Kale Pesto

Recipe at Love & Lemons.

WOW

You made it through a whole week! And it wasn’t bad, right? In case you’re interested in extending the experiment, here are a few more recipes to try.

BREAKFAST IDEAS…

Blueberry Oatmeal Waffles

Blueberry Oatmeal Waffles

Recipe at Post Punk Kitchen.

Apple Cinnamon Oatmeal

Apple Cinnamon Oatmeal

Recipe at veganyumyum.

LUNCH IDEAS…

Wild Rice & Tofu Salad with Miso Dressing

Wild Rice & Tofu Salad with Miso Dressing

This calls for coconut oil to cook the tofu but you can use any kind. Brown or white rice would be good too, although not as pretty. Recipe at Sprouted Kitchen.

BLT Salad

BLT Salad

It may be fake bacon, but it still has the word “bacon” in the name. Recipe at veganyumyum.

Spicy Potato & Black Bean Burritos

Spicy Potato & Black Bean Burritos

Recipe at Oh She Glows.

SNACK IDEAS:

A lot of the snacks you eat normally are still fine on a vegan diet. But if you’ve been deeply dependent on beef jerky or just looking for something healthy to munch on during the day, try these:

roasted almonds
pistachios
dried apricots
granola (bars)
peanut butter on toast or celery
popcorn with olive oil instead of butter
kale chips
fresh fruit
carrots + hummus
edamame

DINNER IDEAS…

Tofu and Eggplant Lasagna

Tofu and Eggplant Lasagna

Recipe at CHOW.

Vegan “Beef” Stew

Vegan

This calls for Trader Joe’s Beef-Less Strips, but you could use tofu or seitan instead, or just skip them. Recipe at Gouda Monster.

Quinoa Chili

Quinoa Chili

Recipe at Two Peas & Their Pod.

DESSERT IDEAS…

Chai Spice Snickerdoodles

Chai Spice Snickerdoodles

Recipe at Post Punk Kitchen.

One-Ingredient Banana Ice Cream

One-Ingredient Banana Ice Cream

Get the recipe at Food52.

Chocolate Avocado Cake

Chocolate Avocado Cake

Avocado is a great sub for butter, and doesn’t make this taste weird or like anything except awesome chocolate cake. Recipe at Joy the Baker.

http://www.buzzfeed.com/rachelysanders/how-to-eat-vegan-for-a-week-and-love-it#.gk8oZBaz1G

9 Best New Proteins for Weight Loss ~ Eat This, Not That!

9 Best New Proteins for Weight Loss

Which plants give you the best weight-loss edge? We look beyond the T-bone to find the absolute best sources of additional protein for your weight-loss goals. (Photos: Shutterstock)

It burns fat. It builds muscle. And it tastes awesome.

It’s easy to love protein. All of our favorite foods — burgers, steaks, pork chops, bacon — are  packed with it. And with the ever-growing popularity of whey-protein shakes, we’re taking in more of this essential muscle maker than ever before.

But are we eating the right kind? While that $9 whey smoothie might be helping your weight loss, there are far more effective — and less expensive — choices. In fact, new research indicates that if you want to lose weight, more of your protein should come not from meat and dairy, but from vegetables. In a study earlier this year in the Journal of Diabetes Investigation, researchers discovered that patients who ingested higher amounts of vegetable protein were far less susceptible to obesity, diabetes and heart disease than those who got most of their protein from animal sources. And a second study in Nutrition Journal found that “plant protein intakes may play a role in preventing obesity.”

Protein is found in almost all plants, especially nuts and whole grains. But not every plant protein is a “complete” protein, meaning one that builds muscle and burns fat just as effectively as meat. So which plants give you the best weight-loss edge? The staff of Eat This, Not That! looked beyond the T-bone to find the absolute best sources of additional protein for your weight-loss goals. Look to eat at least 0.4 grams of total protein per pound of body weight—that’s at least 60 grams a day if you weigh 150, at least 80 grams a day if you weigh 200.

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WEIGHT-LOSS PROTEIN #1: Chia Seeds

Protein in 2 tablespoons: 5 grams

Though chia seeds don’t contain that much protein, they do contain all nine essential amino acids, which means they’re easily converted by the body into muscle. Thanks to the seeds’ blood-sugar stabilizing ratio of satiating protein, fats and fiber, they’re the perfect hunger-busting addition to your diet, and can help you lose inches. But that’s not all: ALAs, the specific type of omega-3s found in chia seeds, can decrease the risk of heart disease, according to a Pennsylvania State University study.

Eat This! Add chia seeds to yogurt or a homemade vegan smoothie to keep your energy levels up all morning long. For 7 plant protein-based smoothies plus hundreds of instant weight loss tips, download the 7-Day Flat-Belly Tea Cleanse now! (Test panelists lost up to 10 pounds in just one week.)

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WEIGHT-LOSS PROTEIN #2: Edamame

Protein per cup: 8 grams

“Steamed soybeans are rich in essential amino acids and fiber,” says nutritionist and trainer Jay Cardiello. And you no longer need to be a sushi devotee to get them; these little packets of nutrition are widely available in the frozen food aisle  and make a super-convenient microwaveable snack. Soybeans also provide a solid hit of complete proteins and magnesium, a mineral that’s essential to muscle development, energy production and carb metabolism.

Eat This! Serve edamame as a side dish or late-night snack. Eat roasted soybeans solo as an on-the-go snack, or add them to homemade trail mixes. Slice and pan-fry tempeh and use it in lieu of meat on a sandwich.

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WEIGHT-LOSS PROTEIN #3: Hemp Seed

Protein in 2 tablespoons: 7 grams

You no longer need to move to Colorado to embrace the magic of hemp. The hemp seed — marijuana’s edible, non-intoxicating cousin — is gaining recognition as a nutritional rock star, for good reason. Studies suggest that hemp seeds can fight heart disease, obesity and metabolic syndrome, likely because they’re rich in protein, fiber and omega-3s.

Eat This! Simply sprinkle the hemp seeds into salads and cereals, or add hemp protein powder to your post-workout shake. Or add them to one of the recipes in this Eat This, Not That! exclusive report: 7 Protein Shake Recipes Personal Trainers Swear By.

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WEIGHT-LOSS PROTEIN #4: Quinoa

Protein per cup: 8 grams

With more than 1,400 quinoa products currently on the market, it’s safe to say that the ancient grain is here to stay. Quinoa is higher in protein than most other grains, packs a hefty dose of heart-healthy unsaturated fats and is also a great source of fiber, a nutrient that can help you feel fuller, longer. It gets better: The mild-tasting grain is also a good source of the amino acid L-arginine, which has been shown to promote muscle over fat gain in animal studies, explains Gina Consalvo, RD, LDN, of Eat Well with Gina. Though we can’t be sure findings will hold true in people, it can’t hurt to add more of this healthy grain to your plate.

Eat This! Pair quinoa with veggie beans to create a well-balanced meal; mix it in with morning oatmeal; use it in place of other grains in cookie recipes; up the flavor and nutrient content of a green salad with a scoop.

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WEIGHT-LOSS PROTEIN #5: Ezekiel Bread

Protein in 2 slices: 8 grams

“Made with sprouted grains, wheat, barley, beans, lentils, millet and spelt, Ezekiel Bread contains 18 amino acids — including all of the nine essential amino acids,” says Consalvo. That’s something most other bread products can’t claim. Making this your go-to sandwich base ensures you get at least 8 grams of complete proteins every time you sit down to lunch.

Eat This! Use Ezekiel Bread any way you’d use traditional bread; it’s extremely versatile, which is why it earned a spot on this essential list of the 10 Best Brand Name Breads for Weight Loss.)

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WEIGHT-LOSS PROTEIN #6: Amaranth

Protein per cup: 9.3 grams

Quinoa isn’t the only “ancient grain” that comes loaded with health perks. Amaranth, a naturally gluten-free seed, is a good source of digestion-aiding fiber, as well as calcium and biceps-building iron.

Eat This! Amaranth takes on a porridge-like texture when cooked, making it a great alternative breakfast option. Whip up a batch and be sure to top off your bowl with some tasty, nutrient-packed toppings, like these 7 Best Oatmeal Toppings That Burn Fat Fast.

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WEIGHT-LOSS PROTEIN # 7: Eggs

Protein per egg: 6 grams

Okay, it’s not a vegetable, but eggs ought to be one of your most consistent protein options. With 6 grams of protein a pop, eggs are an ideal food for vegetarians and omnivores alike who want to stay swimsuit-ready all year round. Their protein fuels your muscles, boosts metabolism and keeps hunger under control, aiding weight loss. “Eggs contain a host of health-promoting and flat-belly nutrients including choline, a major fat-burning nutrient that also plays an important role in brain health,” says Consalvo.

Eat This! Eggs can anchor a breakfast, slide into a sandwich at lunch, beef up a dinnertime salad, or even serve as a protein-filled snack on their own.

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WEIGHT-LOSS PROTEIN #8: Hummus

Protein in 2 tablespoons: 2.2 grams

“Garbanzo beans are high in lysine, and tahini is a rich source of the amino acid methionine. Individually these foods are incomplete proteins, but when you combine the two together to make hummus, they create a complete protein,” explains Consalvo. Just be aware that not all store-bought hummus brands contain tahini. One that does: Pacific Foods Organic Classic Hummus. It’s not only tahini-infused, but also shelf-stable, making it ideal for on-the-go snacking.

Eat This! Spread hummus onto sandwiches in lieu of mustard, mayo and other spreads, or use it as a dip for raw veggies. Looking for more mid-afternoon fuel? Hummus is just one of our 25 Best High-Protein Snacks in America.

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WEIGHT-LOSS PROTEIN #9: Buckwheat

Protein in ½ cup (cooked): 3 grams

Every half-cup serving of this gluten-free seed packs three grams of protein, two grams of belly-flattening fiber (more than you’ll find in oatmeal) and half the day’s magnesium, a mineral that’s essential to muscle development and carb metabolism. What’s more, a 2013 study in the Journal of Nutrition found that higher magnesium intake was associated with lower levels of fasting glucose and insulin, markers related to fat and weight gain. Fill up your plate with the nutritional powerhouse to maintain your flat stomach.

Eat This! Add buckwheat-based Japanese soba noodles to stir-fries or whip up these savory buckwheat pancakes—the tomato avocado salsa with which it’s paired is overflowing with flavors you’re sure to love.

https://www.yahoo.com/health/9-best-new-proteins-for-weight-loss-124838353758.html

Here’s What Real Healthy People Actually Snack On ~ Casey Gueren

When it comes to avoiding that hangry feeling, the best defense is a good offense. And a good offense consists mostly of snacks.

 

That means planning ahead and stocking up on healthy options you’ll actually keep in your kitchen/purse/office fridge/pockets/whatever.

Here's What Real Healthy People Actually Snack On

Because when you have zero time in your day and need to grab something fast, you’ll go for the peanut butter cup every damn time. BUT if you already have something satisfying and better for you on hand: snack win!

HOWEVER, if you hear one more person call a handful of almonds a snack, you can rightfully throw it in their face.

Here's What Real Healthy People Actually Snack On
History / Via imgfave.com

Here are 23 better, more interesting options that will awaken your starving soul.

They’ve all been made (and devoured) by real, seriously healthy people who say things like “satiety” and “fuel your body.” Steal their snackspiration so you’ll never have to go head-to-head with the vending machine again.

1. Open-Faced PB & Blueberries

“This is one of my favorite snacks. Almond butter is a great way to start the day with some awesome protein. And blueberries are my favorite fruit because they’re super low in sugar. When I eat bread it’s ONLY Ezekiel, which is a sprouted grain bread that has no yeast.” —Gabrielle Bernstein, author of Miracles Now

2. Egg and Apple Combo

Egg and Apple Combo

Courtesy of Aaron Flores

“Eating should stimulate all of our senses, and a perfectly cooked hard-boiled egg is about as good as it gets for me. Paired with a green apple, this is the perfect snack to satisfy any hunger and please your palate as well.” —Aaron Flores, RDN, California-based nutritionist specializing in intuitive eating and Healthy at Every Size (HAES)

3. Spiced Apple Chips

“The recipe is incredibly simple — only very thinly sliced apples sprinkled with a little apple pie spice and popped in the oven on a low temperature for a couple hours. The outcome is nutritious and delicious and a great substitute for fried chips. My husband and I brought a bunch of them hiking with us — they make a great portable snack.” —Anne Mauney, MPH, RD, founder of fANNEtasticfood.com

4. Avocado Toast

Avocado Toast

Courtesy of Amelia Winslow

“My favorite way to eat avocados is smashed onto toast with a sprinkle of salt and a few red pepper flakes. If I’m really hungry I add a fried egg. The healthy fat from avocado plus carbohydrates from bread makes it ultra-satisfying and always delicious.” —Amelia Winslow, MS, MPH, nutritionist and founder of Eating Made Easy

5. Spicy And Sweet Roasted Chickpeas

Spicy And Sweet Roasted Chickpeas

Courtesy of Nita Sharda

“I like this as a snack for when I’m craving something savory. The crunchy bite size peas are also loaded with protein and fiber, so a little goes a long way.” —Nita Sharda, RD, owner of Carrots and Cake Balanced Nutrition Consulting (See the full recipe here.)

6. Banana Nut Toast

Banana Nut Toast

Courtesy of Anjali Shah

“This is a slice of sprouted wheat bread with ½ tablespoon almond butter, ½ tablespoon peanut butter, ¼ sliced banana and 1 teaspoon chopped walnuts on top — with an optional sprinkle of cinnamon and drizzle of honey. This delicious snack packs a protein and fiber punch guaranteed to keep you full in between meals.” —Anjali Shah, board certified health coach and founder of The Picky Eater

7. A Makeshift Pudding Cup

“Greek yogurt mixed with some chocolate protein powder and raspberries makes for a perfect high-protein snack under 200 calories. You’re getting a good source of probiotics from the Greek yogurt, antioxidants and fiber from the raspberries, and an extra boost of protein from half a scoop of whey protein.” —Katie Yip, New York City-based Pilates teacher

8. Miso Zoodle Soup

“I love noodle soup, but most are just carb bombs in a bowl. I used my new spiralizer to make zucchini noodles, then whipped up miso broth, which contains probiotics that boost gut health by supporting digestion, and then tossed in some carrots, mushrooms, ginger, and spinach.” —Michele Promaulayko, editor-in-chief of Yahoo Health and author of the new book 20 Pounds Younger

9. Blueberry Coconut Balls

Blueberry Coconut Balls

Courtesy of Danielle Omar / Via foodconfidence.com

“These no-bake snack balls are made with antioxidant-rich frozen wild blueberries. If you eat them right away they are super cold and refreshing, but if you let them thaw a bit they are melt-in-your-mouth delicious!” (See the full recipe here.) —Danielle Omar, MS, RD

10. A Picturesque Cheese Plate

“This is a simple, on-the-fly appetizer made up of stuff I had in the fridge — olives, grape tomatoes, caper berries. Anchoring the plate is a hunk of feta cheese that I dressed up with some chopped oregano from the garden and red onion.” —Monica Reinagel, licensed nutritionist and host of the Nutrition Diva podcast

11. Fruit Pizza

“This watermelon ‘pizza’ is a perfect low-calorie treat that satisfies the sweet tooth, replenishes your muscles, and hydrates your body. Ideal for a hot summer day, a party snack, or post-workout, since it will help replenish glycogen stores in your muscles and aid recovery. Both the watermelon and banana also help with bloating! ” —Idalis Velazquez, NASM-CPT, founder of IV Fitness

12. A Loaded Sweet Potato

A Loaded Sweet Potato

Courtesy of Anjali Prasertong

“My favorite mid-morning snack is a leftover roasted sweet potato, split open and stuffed with a couple dollops of plain Greek yogurt. If I’m feeling fancy, I’ll sprinkle it with furikake, a super-flavorful Japanese seasoning mix with toasted nori and sesame seeds. With all the protein, healthy carbs, and fiber, it’s a snack that keeps me satisfied for hours.” —Anjali Prasertong, contributing editor at The Kitchn and graduate student studying to become a registered dietitian

13. A Fruit Smoothie That Only Looks Like a Daiquiri

“California Sunshine Smoothie! Yummy — 139 calories and 7 grams of fiber. Try it! All organic: 10 strawberries, 1 orange, ½ a medium banana, 1 cup of ice, and water!” —Jeanette Jenkins, president of The Hollywood Trainer

14. Cheese, Crackers, Tomatoes, and Veggies

“This great combination keeps you full and promotes satiety. Protein comes from the delicious mozzarella cheese (a low-fat selection), the fiber comes from the high-fiber crackers (one with 5 grams of fiber or more), and vegetables!” —Shelly Marie Redmond, RD, author of Eat Well and Be Fabulous

15. Homemade Sweet Potato Chips

“I love this because it’s whole food eating – a two-ingredient snack solution.” 
—Rachel Beller, MS, RDN, founder of Beller Nutritional Institute and author of Eat to Lose, Eat to Win

16. Apple Peanut Butter Toasts

“A good, satisfying, filling snack and the tasty health benefits of cinnamon and SunButter — a healthy option for anyone with nut allergies. It also has more unsaturated fat, magnesium, iron, zinc, and vitamin E than peanut butter.” —David Kirsch, celebrity trainer and founder of David Kirsch Wellness

17. Cheddar Kale Chips

“Dedicated to all the people who are over ridiculously priced kale chips. These savory chips make for the perfect snack, and won’t hurt your pockets.” (See the full recipe here.) —Wendy Lopez, nutritionist, and Jessica Jones, MS, RD, co-hosts of Food Heaven Made Easy

18. A Cookie You Can Make IN A PAN

“Cookies have been a great tool for me when I train really hard in the gym and need a carbohydrate or sugar boost to refuel my muscle and liver glycogen. Often store-bought cookies are too high in fat to be a good post-workout tool. Therefore, I get creative in my kitchen and got obsessed with a cookie that gets cooked in a pan. I dreamed of something that was part pancake, part gooey and crunchy cookie! This is ¼ cup quick-cooking oats, 1 tablespoon coconut flour, 1 tablespoon agave nectar, 1 whole egg, 1 scoop chocolate whey protein powder, Stevia-sweetened chocolate chips, and a dash of salt. Stir it up and add a splash of milk if needed for consistency. Cook in a nonstick pan sprayed with coconut oil. Cook on low and flip when it starts to bubble — just like when cooking pancakes. It’s only 330 calories!” —Holly Perkins, CSCS, author of the upcoming Lift to Get Lean

19. Crudités For One

“This is what I typically eat as a mid-morning snack. It is carrot sticks, celery sticks, half an avocado, beetroot, and spinach, accompanied with almond butter and cottage cheese. This gives the perfect balance of protein and veggies to keep me satisfied and full until the next meal.” —Aina Hussain, registered nutritionist and founder of The Fruitful Foodie

20. Cauliflower Fries

From her Instagram: “I just made French fries out of cauliflower and @questnutrition protein powder. Hey! Don’t say ew until you try it. It’s seriously amazing!” (See the full recipe here.) —Cassey Ho, creator of POP Pilates

21. This Bright and Cheery Deliciousness

“I love because it I looove fresh fruit and veggies — and goat cheese and avocado call my name regularly! It’s a perfect mini meal or snack, because it’s packed with nutrients including antioxidants and fiber to help keep you full. Plus the healthy fat in avocado provides satiety, and who doesn’t love the sweetness of mango and taste of goat cheese? The combo may seem funny, but it is a real food combo that is a winning gem. Promise!” —Keri Glassman, MS, RD, CDN, author of The New You and Improved Diet

22. Kale Guacamole Wraps

“Just wilt kale or any other leafy green by soaking in warm water for a few minutes, then stuff with whatever you want and enjoy!” (See the full recipe here.) —Wendy Lopez, nutritionist, and Jessica Jones, MS, RD, co-hosts of Food Heaven Made Easy

23. A Smoothie In A Bowl

A Smoothie In A Bowl

Courtesy of Kath Younger

“One of my favorite snacks is a smoothie made with oats served in a bowl. This one is a cup of frozen berries, half a banana, a cup of milk, and a quarter cup of oats thrown in a blender, then topped with toasted buckwheat and nut butter. The oats give the smoothie a nice doughy taste, plus they amp up the nutrition with extra fiber and energy! And enjoying it as a ‘soup’ means I savor every last bite.” —Kath Younger, RD, founder of Kath Eats Real Food

http://www.buzzfeed.com/caseygueren/healthy-noms

Salubrious Saturday – What Does the World Eat for Breakfast?

This I found to be a fun little side trip into the ever popular world of breakfast. So what does the world eat for breakfast? Well for me eggs are always a safe bet, but some of these other options look quite good. I do love food. Stay Healthy and Enjoy!

 

 

Breakfast is the first meal taken after rising from a night’s sleep, most often eaten in the early morning before undertaking the day’s work.[1] Among English speakers, “breakfast” can be used to refer to this meal or to refer to a meal composed of traditional breakfast foods (such as eggs, oatmeal and sausage) served at any time of day. The word literally refers to breaking the fasting period of the prior night.[2]

Breakfast foods vary widely from place to place, but often include a carbohydrate such as grains or cereals, fruit and/or vegetables, a protein food such as eggs, meat or fish, and a beverage such as tea, coffee, milk or fruit juice. Coffee, milk, tea, juice, breakfast cereals, pancakes, sausages, French toast, bacon, sweet breads, fresh fruit, vegetables, eggs, mushrooms, baked beans, muffins, crumpets and toast with butter or margarine and/or jam or marmalade are common examples of breakfast foods, though a large range of preparations and ingredients are associated with breakfast globally.[3]

Some nutritional experts have long referred to breakfast as the most important meal of the day, citing studies that find that people who skip breakfast are disproportionately likely to have problems with concentration, metabolism, weight, and cardiac health.[4][5][6] The nutritionist Monica Reinagel has argued the metabolic benefits have been exaggerated, noting the improvement in cognition has been found among children, but is much less significant among adults. Reinagel also explains that the link between skipping breakfast and increased weight is likely behavioral—compensating with snacks and/or eating more later—and therefore not inevitable.[7] Some say that skipping breakfast may even lead to diabetes as well as coronary disease.[8]

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breakfast