Launching February 14th

Happy To Announce:

 

On February 14th Live Your Life Inspired will launch two new projects:

  1. Health & Wellness Coaching:

    For a limited time, three Free health and wellness coaching sessions with a Mayo Clinic trained Wellness Coach. The three sessions include one consultation and two follow up sessions. The coach can assist you in clarifying your Health & Wellness Goals, Establishing Priorities, and Identifying Strategies for Success. For more information or to participate, email info@liveyourlifeinspired.org.

  2. Basic Vegan:

    This will not be a traditional food blog: 1) It won’t be filled with pretty, well orchestrated pictures, to be honest I don’t have the time to create “food porn.” The pictures will be simple, honest, and if I have a minute I may throw a filter on it. 2) I’m going to be honest, always, even when whatever I just cooked tastes disgusting (that will happen) and when I miss my goals (which will also happen). 3) This will be a journey of self-love. If I, an omnivore who uses overeating as an ineffective method of coping with overwhelming stress and pain, can transition to herbivore…so can you. There is nothing that I will do that can’t be done be someone else. There is no magic nor manipulation. This is just my honest attempt to live a healthier, fuller vegan life.

 

For additional information on these projects, submit the contact form below:

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Why It Was Easier to Be Skinny in the 1980s ~ Olga Khazan

There’s a meme aimed at Millennial catharsis called “Old Economy Steve.” It’s a series of pictures of a late-70s teenager, who presumably is now a middle-aged man, that mocks some of the messages Millennials say they hear from older generations—and shows why they’re deeply janky. Old Economy Steve graduates and gets a job right away. Old Economy Steve “worked his way through college” because tuition was $400. And so forth.

Quickmeme

We can now add another one to that list: Old Economy Steve ate at McDonald’s almost every day, and he still somehow had a 32-inch waist.

MemeGenerator.net

study published recently in the journal Obesity Research & Clinical Practice found that it’s harder for adults today to maintain the same weight as those 20 to 30 years ago did, even at the same levels of food intake and exercise.

The authors examined the dietary data of 36,400 Americans between 1971 and 2008 and the physical activity data of 14,419 people between 1988 and 2006. They grouped the data sets together by the amount of food and activity, age, and BMI.

They found a very surprising correlation: A given person, in 2006, eating the same amount of calories, taking in the same quantities of macronutrients like protein and fat, and exercising the same amount as a person of the same age did in 1988 would have a BMI that was about 2.3 points higher. In other words, people today are about 10 percent heavier than people were in the 1980s, even if they follow the exact same diet and exercise plans.

“Our study results suggest that if you are 25, you’d have to eat even less and exercise more than those older, to prevent gaining weight,” Jennifer Kuk, a professor of kinesiology and health science at Toronto’s York University, said in a statement. “However, it also indicates there may be other specific changes contributing to the rise in obesity beyond just diet and exercise.”

Just what those other changes might be, though, are still a matter of hypothesis. In an interview, Kuk proffered three different factors that might be making harder for adults today to stay thin.

First, people are exposed to more chemicals that might be weight-gain inducing. Pesticides, flame retardants, and the substances in food packaging might all be altering our hormonal processes and tweaking the way our bodies put on and maintain weight.

Second, the use of prescription drugs has risen dramatically since the ‘70s and ‘80s. Prozac, the first blockbuster SSRI, came out in 1988. Antidepressants are now one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in the U.S., and many of them have been linked to weight gain.

Finally, Kuk and the other study authors think that the microbiomes of Americans might have somehow changed between the 1980s and now. It’s well known that some types of gut bacteria make a person more prone to weight gain and obesity. Americans are eating more meat than they were a few decades ago, and many animal products are treated with hormones and antibiotics in order to promote growth. All that meat might be changing gut bacteria in ways that are subtle, at first, but add up over time. Kuk believes the proliferation of artificial sweeteners could also be playing a role.

The fact that the body weights of Americans today are influenced by factors beyond their control is a sign, Kuk says, that society should be kinder to people of all body types.

“There’s a huge weight bias against people with obesity,” she said. “They’re judged as lazy and self-indulgent. That’s really not the case. If our research is correct, you need to eat even less and exercise even more” just to be same weight as your parents were at your age.

The exercise part is perhaps one area where Old Economy Steve doesn’t have an edge. A membership at one of the newfangled fitness centers of 1987 would gofor about $2,800 per year in today’s dollars, and that’s still what it costs today.

 

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2015/09/why-it-was-easier-to-be-skinny-in-the-1980s/407974/?utm_source=yahoo

Depression Slideshow: Tips for Exercise, Diet and Stress Reduction ~ WebMD

Young thoughtful woman, indoors

Tips for Recovering From Depression

If you’ve had depression, you know how hopeless you can feel. It’s important to get professional treatment. But there are things you can do to ease symptoms of depression. Exercise, changing your diet, and even playing with a pet can improve your mood. Click to the next slide to see how you can start regaining control of your life.

 
 

Woman sitting with dog on jetty, rear view

Let Your Pet Nuzzle Blues Away

Sometimes your pet really can be your best friend — and that’s good therapy. When you play with your pet, you take your mind off your problems. Also, when you take care of your pet you’re fulfilling a commitment to something outside yourself. Caring for others can be very therapeutic.

 
 

Young woman at table with plate of food, smiling

Eat Smart to Lift Mind and Body

There’s a connection between mind and body. Although there is no specific diet that works for depression, a healthy diet can be part of an overall treatment plan. Build your diet around plenty of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains to help boost your physical and emotional health.

 
 
 

Salmon fillet with spinach and lemon wedge

Choose Foods to Boost Your Mood

Some studies suggest omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin B12 — especially for people for may not get enough of these nutrients — may ease the mood changes that are part of depression. Fatty fish such as salmon, tuna, and mackerel contain omega-3 fatty acids. So do flaxseed, nuts, soybeans, and dark green vegetables. Seafood and low-fat dairy products are sources of B12. Vegetarians who eat no meat or fish can get B12 in fortified cereals, dairy products, and  supplements.

 
 

Fresh popcorn in carton

Try Low-Fat Carbs for a Pick-Me-Up

Serotonin is a brain chemical that enhances your sense of well-being. Carbohydrates raise the level of serotonin in your brain. Low-fat carbs such as popcorn, a baked potato, graham crackers, or pasta are options. Vegetables, fruit, and whole grain options also provide fiber.

 
 

Businessman crushing coffee cup

Drink Less Caffeine to Improve Mood

Do you really need that third cup of coffee? Anxiety can accompany depression. And too much caffeine can make you nervous, jittery, or anxious. While possible links between caffeine and depression haven’t been definitively established, cutting back on caffeinated drinks may help lower your risk of depression and improve sleep. 

 
 
 

Man with headache

Treat Your Aches and Pains

Feelings of depression can be related to pain. Work with your health care team to treat your depression and your pain.

 
 

couple on a treadmill in a gym

Exercise to Change the Way You Feel

For some people, exercise works almost as well as antidepressants. And you don’t have to run a marathon. Just take a walk with a friend. As time goes on, increase activity until you exercise on most days. You’ll feel better physically, sleep better at night, and improve your mood.

 
 

Two men on outdoor basketball court

Choose an Exercise You Enjoy

If you don’t like to run, you won’t last long training for a marathon. But you will stay with a moderate exercise you enjoy. For instance, try walking, golfing without a cart, riding a bike, working in your garden, playing tennis, or swimming. The important thing is to pick something you like. Then you’ll look forward to it and feel better when you do it.

 
 
 

Group of women with instructor in exercise class

Exercise With Others for Support

Staying connected with other people helps overcome the lethargy, exhaustion, and loneliness of depression. Join an exercise group or exercise with a friend. You’ll stay connected. And you’ll have support to help you stay on track!

 
 

Woman opening curtains, looking out window

Be Sure You Get Enough Sunlight

Do you feel more depressed during darker, cold months? You may have seasonal affective disorder, or SAD. SAD is most common in the winter, when there’s less sunlight. SAD can be treated with light therapy or exposure to artificial sunlight, antidepressants, and psychotherapy.

 
 

Woman photographing forest on digital camera

Explore Your Creativity

Painting, photography, music, knitting, or writing in a journal: These are all ways people explore their feelings and express what’s on their mind. Being creative can help you feel better. The goal isn’t to create a masterpiece. Do something that gives you pleasure. It may help you better understand who you are and how you feel.

 
 
 

Man sitting in woods listening to music

Make Time for Mindful Relaxation

Stress and anxiety can increase your depression symptoms and make it harder to recover. Learning to mentally relax can help restore a sense of calm and control. You might consider a yoga or meditation class. Or you could simply listen to soothing music while you take a long, hot bath.

 
 

Group of people lifting wall of unfinished house

Become Actively Involved

Being involved with others can help you regain a sense of purpose. And it doesn’t take much to get started. Try volunteering with a charity. Or join a discussion group at the library or at church. Meeting new people and doing new things will help you feel good about yourself.

 
 

smiling family having a meal at a picnic table

Keep Friends and Family in Your Life

The people who love you want to support you. If you shut them out, they can’t. If you let them in, you’ll feel a lot better. Call a friend and go for a walk. Have a cup of coffee with your partner. You may find it helps to talk about your depression. It feels good to have someone listen.

 
 
 

Young woman sleeping, close-up

Get the Healthy Sleep You Need

Depression interferes with healthy sleep. Some people with depression sleep too much. Others can’t fall asleep easily. As you recover from depression, relearn good sleep habits. Start by going to bed and getting up the same time each day. Use relaxation techniques to help you fall asleep. Healthy sleep makes you feel better physically and mentally.

 
 

Man sitting at bar looking at glass of liquor

Avoid Alcohol and Drugs

Alcohol and drugs can slow or prevent recovery from depression. They can also make your depression worse and interfere with the medicines you take for depression. If you have a problem with substance abuse, ask for help now. You’ll have a far better chance of recovering from depression.

 
 

Female Doctor Talking to Patient

Continue Your Treatment

The steps outlined in these slides may help you feel positive about your life. But alone, they’re not enough. They won’t replace medical treatment or talk therapy. Depression is a serious illness, and it carries a risk of suicide. If you are thinking about suicide, seek help immediately. And never stop or change treatment without discussing it carefully with your doctor.

 

http://www.webmd.com/depression/ss/slideshow-depression-diet-stress-exercise?ecd=wnl_men_100215&ctr=wnl-men-100215_nsl-ld-stry_img&mb=RbO7%2fvTOx1EjKOU4pPXoLChonS%2fH3cwyP02j5xZ6yv4%3d&print=true

3 Healthy Alternatives to Potato Chips (With Easy Recipes Too) ~ The Doctors

Before you grab a bag of potato chips to snack on – and then probably end up eating the entire bag – consider these healthier (and tasty!) alternatives that won’t pack on the pounds. 

Rose Petal Chips

THE DOCTORS

They’re made from beets, a veggie rich in essential vitamins and minerals, such as potassium, magnesium, iron and vitamins A, B and C. And, they are particularly beneficial for pregnant women. Additionally, this recipe spices things up with a sprinkle of rosemary, which has been shown to reduce inflammation, increase blood flow and stimulate the immune system.

Get the recipe! 

Source: Running to the Kitchen  

Brussels Sprout Chips

THE DOCTORS

Brussels sprouts are not just your old-school stinky veggie. These chips are rich in vitamin C and because they’re high in fiber, they can aid in digestion as well as help to reduce cholesterol. 

Get the recipe here! 

Source: Epicurious  


Parsnip Chips

THE DOCTORS

A relative of carrots, celery and parsley, parsnips are indeed a power veggie. It’s a naturally sweet root vegetable that can boost the immune system and help to promote nerve function, red blood cell growth and dental health.  Plus, parsnips are rich in dietary fiber, potassium and vitamin C, and may help prevent heart disease. 

Get the recipe here!  

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/3-healthy-alternatives-to-potato-chips-with-easy-recipes-too_55e9cdc2e4b03784e275bc2d

The Beauty & Health Benefits of an Alkaline Diet ~ Sara Bliss

The alkaline diet has health and beauty benefits. (Photo: Henry Leutwyler)

The alkaline diet has been earning raves from celebrities such as Kelly RipaKate Hudson, and Elle MacPherson. Ripa actually went so far as to say the diet “changed her life,” helping her heal physical pain. The idea is that by replacing foods that cause excess acidity like meat, dairy, alcohol, sugar, and flour — with more alkaline foods like vegetables, legumes, and nuts — your body will be less susceptible to disease and inflammation. “To achieve health, radiance, energy, and permanent weight loss, it is helpful to understand the underlying causes of diseases and obesity which are acids and inflammation,” explains Ripa’s nutritionist and chiropractor Dr. Daryl Gioffre.

If anyone is an ad for an alkaline diet it’s Gioffre. The high-energy, fit, 40-year-old (who looks about a decade younger) credits the lifestyle with helping him shed 42 pounds and a sugar addiction. He tried the eating plan 10 years ago, when despite trying dozens of diets he couldn’t break the cycle of weight gain and sugar cravings. An alkaline diet finally brought change (and a 12-pound weight loss within one week). He now eats alkaline 80% of the time and says it’s transformed his life. “I have more energy than I did in my 20s, I’m running triathlons and ultra-marathons, and I can’t remember the last time I was sick,” he tells Yahoo Beauty.

To provide a whole body approach to healing for his chiropractic clients, Gioffre made nutrition a major focus of his work. “I really started diving into nutrition, cleansing, and alkalinity as I realized that toxicity and nutritional deficiencies were at the core of everyone’s health and skin issues,” he says. The nutritionist believes that allergies, stress, fatigue, headaches, hormonal imbalances, digestive issues, weak immune systems, poor sleep, and skin problems are all problems that can be healed with lifestyle changes. “These are your body’s cries for help!” he says. “Whenever I see someone with a skin condition, it is a sign that there is a lot of acidity in their body.”

To find out if going alkaline was indeed as transformative as promised, I decided to try Gioffre’s Get Off Your Acid 7-Day Cleanse. Note, that I am typically against fad diets. I don’t even bother trying any because the discipline required to cut out entire food groups seems like way too much work. I truly believe things like cheese and pie are some of the great joys of life. Plus, I have a major sweet tooth. I’ve tried juice cleanses which left me cranky, starving, and the same exact weight when I started. I was skeptical that an alkaline cleanse wouldn’t do anything more than give me major food cravings for a week, but I couldn’t report on it without experiencing it for myself.

While a visit with Gioffre is just under $300, his cleanse can be done online for a cost of $97. To begin, he preps his cleanse patients with pages and pages of information, but the gist is this: You have to cut out all dairy, alcohol, meat, coffee, sugar, and gluten. Unfortunately for me peanut butter, one of the staples of my diet, is apparently wildly acidic and inflammatory, so that was out, too. However, Gioffre doesn’t frame the cleanse in terms of what you are cutting out. Instead, he provides an entire meal plan with tons of recipes to choose from that he promises are delicious. He changes his recipes according to the seasons and recommends that clients do a cleanse four times a year.

Each morning starts with a smoothie. The first day, I blended coconut water, baby spinach, berries, bananas, and chia seeds. I’ve never put veggies in my morning smoothies before. Ditto on Omega 3 rich chia seeds. To be honest, I usually mix smoothies with orange juice or yogurt (both alkaline no no’s). However, I found that you really don’t notice the vegetables or the chia seeds at all. As the week progressed, I began to look forward to trying out a new smoothie each morning — the recipes were that good.

 

The food chart. (Photo: Dr. Daryl Gioffre)

If you follow the plan to the letter and do all the recipes, it requires a lot of shopping, cooking, and prep time. None of the recipes really take longer than 20 minutes to make, but for those who exist on takeout, it will be way more work than you are used to. However, the plan suggests taking the leftovers from dinner dishes like zucchini pasta with spinach lemon pesto or chilled avocado and cucumber soup, for lunch the next day. When I couldn’t cook or cart food to work, I just ordered make-your-own salads including as many of the most alkaline foods as I could (watercress, spinach, kale, cucumber, broccoli, avocado, celery, red bell pepper, and swiss chard).

One of the things that you’ll notice is that there aren’t a lot of fruits on the cleanse — it’s mainly vegetables. “To your body sugar is sugar,” explains Gioffre. “Sugar ferments when it goes into the body and that fermentation process is what makes it acidic.”  

The most surprising thing about the experience, however, is that I wasn’t ever hungry. Normally, I would grab several snacks in an afternoon–a sweetened yogurt here, a few M & M’s there. But I lost my cravings for snacks, and my biggest weakness of all — sugar. Apparently this is a common result of eating more alkaline foods. “Your body is working more efficiently and does not require as much energy to neutralize the acid because you are less acidic. So your body won’t need to ravish for food,” explains Gioffre. 

The recipes really are appealing, although I definitely preferred some over others.  However, part of the reason the cleanse wasn’t that difficult I am already pretty healthy. I have always loved vegetarian dishes. I think it would be more of a shock for someone who eats a lot of meat and drinks coffee and cocktails everyday. I tried to cheat one day and have a glass of wine, and I felt completely nauseous. For me the big downside was that I woke up most mornings with major headaches. Drinking a ton of water (you’re supposed to drink about half your body weight in water on the cleanse) would help ease the pain, but they were frequent and apparently a symptom of detoxing.

The cleanse isn’t all about food. To help encourage detoxing, you are also supposed to dry brush your skin in the morning, take hot baths in Epsom salts and baking soda at night, and do breath work.  You also need to take Gioffre’s Alkamind Daily Greens with and Alkamind Daily Minerals powders. The green powder mixed with water takes a little getting used to (it’s pretty unappealing tastewise).

Despite going in skeptical, the experience was surprisingly transformative. For starters, my skin —which I always cover up with foundation because of rosacea — looked more even than it has in years with the redness visibly diminished. The other day, I skipped the foundation altogether, something that hasn’t happened maybe ever. I did lose a little bit of weight — just two pounds, although Gioffre promises it will stay off.  He says the difference with this and a juice cleanse where you lose water weight is you are losing actual fat. “The best part is that you can continue to lose that weight as long as you keep your diet 80% alkaline.”  Unlike a juice cleanse, where I couldn’t wait to get back to real foods, I want to keep eating this way. Since the diet ended four days ago, I’ve added a little protein, but kept up the primarily vegan meals and morning smoothies.

A common misconception about the diet is that it will change your blood’s pH levels.  However, that’s not possible as your body tightly regulates your pH and your diet isn’t going to affect your blood’s pH. It’s an argument critics of the diet use, but Gioffre says that they aren’t understanding the point. “The purpose of eating alkaline isn’t to try and raise your pH. Your body is going to maintain that on its own,” explains Gioffre. “The problem is, if there a lot of acidity, your body will sacrifice other things including bone and cardiovascular health. To meet these acidic demands, the body starts to drain alkaline minerals from its own resources like magnesium from your muscles causing muscle cramps and fatigue, and calcium from your bones and cartilage leading to osteoporosis, joint pain and bad posture. Even sodium bicarbonate from you mouth causing tooth decay. The loss of these essential minerals accelerates the aging process.”

To maintain weight loss, glowing skin, increased energy, and healthy food cravings, Gioffre says that I have to follow a rule of eating alkaline at least 70% of the time, ideally 80%. To me, 70% sounds doable leaving room for the occasional slice of pie. “When your body is in that alkaline state, your body is armed to process those acidic things out when you want to indulge,” Gioffre promises. “People think that to live healthy you have to take away all the foods that you love and it’s not true. You have to enjoy the process to sustain health.”

https://www.yahoo.com/beauty/the-beauty-health-benefits-of-an-alkaline-diet-128224028413.html

Here’s the extreme diet and fitness plan regular people used to look like underwear models in 30 days ~ Jessica Orwig

These people might look like underwear models, but they’re not. And 30 days before this photo was taken, they didn’t look like this.

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(Viceroy Creative) From left to right: Viceroy Creative’s CFO Aaron Bearce, creative director Gabrielle Rein, account manager Raegan Gillette, and president David Moritz

In fact, they were just regular people who worked for an advertising agency and, while they worked out a fair amount, they ate pretty much what they pleased.

But in just a few weeks, the women slimmed down to have as little as 12% to 14% body fat and the man had just 5% to 6% body fat.

And that woman on the left? She was pregnant just five months before the photo was taken.

The key to their success: A low-fat, high-protein diet and intense, professionally guided exercise. They also had some good motivation from their employer: They were asked to be models in an upcoming photo shoot for their agency’s rebranding, posing buck naked.

Why they chose to pose buck naked 

The three extreme dieters work for Viceroy Creative, an advertising agency that wanted to rebrand itself in a powerful way last March. As part of the rebranding, they asked some of their key executives to be part of a buzzy photo shoot that would present them totally nude.

The participants were the firm’s creative director Gabrielle Rein, account manager Raegan Gillette, and president David Moritz — the naked man in the photos. Mortiz tells AdWeek they agreed to the shoot for the good of the company and their clients.

Getting model-thin in a hurry took a great deal of mental and physical endurance, and it’s that kind of diligent dedication that Viceroy wanted to communicate in their new campaign, Moritz tells Business Insider.

VC6

(Viceroy Creative)
How they got rock-hard abs in such a short time

Before they started preparing for the shoot, Viceroy’s executives were in decent shape. Still, each worked hard those final weeks to get ready for the big nude day. Here’s a picture of a topless Moritz two years before the training began:

G1  122

(Courtesy of David Moritz) What David Moritz looked like two years before he started training with Equinox.

Gabrielle Rein, Viceroy’s creative director, had a baby just a few months earlier, so the preparation was especially challenging and rewarding.

When they agreed to the nude photo shoot last year, they gave themselves five months to get fit.

For the first four months, they completed a series of trainings designed to strengthen their muscles, bolster their cardiovascular strength, and increase their metabolism. Here’s the company’s account manager, Raegan Gillette, doing one of the exercises:

Your browser does not support the video tag. Viceroy Creative 

But those four months of exercises weren’t what ultimately got them the sculpted bodies in the photos.

Diet was the key to their success

“No matter how much exercise you do, that will only get you part of the way. In terms of seeing abs and muscle definition, it’s all about diet and reducing your body fat percentage. That’s essential,” Moritz says.

For the last four weeks, the Viceroy executives committed to a grueling diet. The goal, said Moritz, was to cut body fat so that the muscles they’d been toning for the previous four months would shine through.

VC3

(Viceroy Creative)
Each executive ate six meals a day, catered specifically to their needs by a nutritionist. Although each diet was unique, the meals mostly consisted of the same types of food, Moritz says, and included a lot of protein.

“You need [protein] to continue to build muscle,” Moritz explains. “Which is a little bit more than one gram of protein per every pound that you weigh.”

For Moritz — who was still able to recite the diet by heart months after the shoot — the meals consisted of:

  • Meal 1: 1/2 cup oatmeal, 1/2 cup almond milk, 1/2 cup blueberries, one scoop carb-free protein shake
  • Meal 2: 3 egg whites, 1/4 cup plain potatoes
  • Meal 3: 3 oz. ground turkey, low-carb wrap with a cup of romaine lettuce
  • Meal 4: 3 oz. grilled chicken and 1/4 of an avocado
  • Meal 5: 6 oz. fish with a 1/4 cup steamed jasmine rice and six pieces of asparagus
  • Meal 6: 6 oz. of 99% lean ground beef with 1/4 avocado and 1 cup romaine lettuce
  • No alcohol was allowed and most condiments were banned (with the exception of hot sauce, since it added a negligible amount of extra sugar or fat)

That’s it, each and every day, for an entire month! At first they had the meals prepared for them by a chef but that quickly became too expensive to maintain. They began preparing the meals themselves, which required a scale and measuring cups to make sure they consumed exactly what the nutritionist ordered.

Despite consuming significantly fewer calories than he was used to, Moritz said he didn’t feel too many negative effects from the strict plan, aside from boredom from the food.

“You don’t feel tired because your body is getting what it needs,” said Moritz.

Moritz pointed out that he was at about 5% body fat on the day of the photo shoot, which is close to the lowest a man his age and height should be. Body builders have between 3.5% and 5% body fat on competition day.

The number of calories they burned versus how many they ate

If you add it up, Moritz consumed roughly 1,700 calories per day, far fewer than the 2,400 to 2,500 calories he was burning throughout the day, he tells Business Insider.

According to the Mayo Clinic, a man his age and height should be consuming at least 1,600 calories a day even if they’re trying to lose weight. So he was pushing the bare minimum.

VC4

(Viceroy Creative)
The women were eating about 1,300 calories and burning 2,000 calories each day. For them, the Mayo Clinic estimates that women in their age and height ranges should eat at least 1,200 calories a day even if they’re trying to lose weight.

“The plan puts you in a relatively significant caloric deficit every day,” Moritz says. “And it forces your body to burn stored fat.”

In addition to the diet, the executives stuck to a grueling fitness routine. All of them worked out every day for an hour and a half, seven days a week with the help of professional trainers at their local Equinox gym.

The exercises included intense weight lifting and low-impact cardiovascular activities — like walking on a treadmill set with the highest incline — that burned most of the large amount calories they were losing each day. The rest were lost through regular daily activities like walking.

Here’s Gillette doing one of the weight-lifting exercises:

Your browser does not support the video tag. Viceroy Creative

The regimen wasn’t cheap. The nutritionist Viceroy used charges $700 a person for a month-long program. And an average Equinox Tier 3+ trainer — the most intense trainer you can get at Equinox — costs $135 per session, and each exec was completing a few sessions a week during the entire training process.

Moritz says anyone can get into this kind of shape given the time and motivation, however.

VC1

(Viceroy Creative)
“While we did it with a lot of extensive help, a person can do this on their own given just a little more time,” Moritz says. “Follow the same basic principles and find a way to get really motivated. It’s just all mental.”

For Moritz and the rest of the team, the motivator that kept them dedicated was a pretty strong one:

“Knowing that you’re going to send naked pictures of yourself to as many people as you can makes you stay with it,” he says.

After the shoot, Moritz, Rein, and Bearce slowly regained some of their body fat to a more reasonable amount, but they continued to stick with a modified version of the diet.

For Moritz, the five-month regimen was only a beginning. Since the photo shoot, he’s stuck with it. (He now uses a food-delivery service to stick with his diet.) By the end of the summer, he says, that he suspects he’ll even be in better shape than he was in March. Rein also kept her beautiful post-baby physique, getting into increasingly better shape even after the training was over, Moritz said.

Here’s what she looks like months later and after feasting on ribs, BBQ, and hamburgers over Memorial Day weekend of this year. She’s 31 years old.

img class=

(Courtesy of Gabrielle Rein) 

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/heres-extreme-diet-fitness-plan-140841508.html

9 Ways to Quit Sugar for Good ~ Esther Crain

Here’s a shocker: the average person takes in 22 teaspoons of sugar daily—more than three times the amount suggested by the American Heart Association. And although it has never been considered a health food, new evidence shows sugar can do even more damage than previously thought, setting you up for obesity, diabetes, and heart disease. But weaning yourself off sugar can be daunting. It’s tough to dodge because it hides in so many foods, and it provides an almost addictive buzz, thanks to a surge of the neurotransmitter dopamine after it enters the body, says research neuroscientist Nicole Avena, PhD, author of Why Diets Fail (Because You’re Addicted to Sugar) ($19; amazon.com). Still, slashing sugar is one food trend worth trying. Find out all about sugar rehab, plus tactics to make your commitment stick.

The dangers of sweet stuff

Sugar has 16 calories per teaspoon. That doesn’t seem like much, but it can pack on hundreds of calories without offering any nutritional value, says Avena. Extra calories raise your risk of obesity, which in turn sets you up for diabetes.

A 2013 study found that for every 150 calories of added sugar consumed in a population—the equivalent of one can of soda—diabetes prevalence in the population went up 1.1%. Then there’s the research tying sugar to heart disease. A 2014 study from JAMA: Internal Medicine found that the more added sugar a person took in, the higher their odds of dying of heart disease.

Don’t forget about the way sugar plays with blood glucose levels, sending them surging, then crashing—leaving you fatigued, brain fogged, and irritable, says Brittany Kohn, RD, a New York City nutritionist.

Cut this kind of sugar

The sugar offender to steer clear of is refined white sugar, the kind spooned into coffee or added to baked goods. The bloodstream absorbs this simple sugar quickly, causing surges in blood glucose levels and insulin that can wreak havoc on the body, says Avena.

Refined sugar is also added to countless food products during processing, from ketchup to bread to salad dressing to beef jerky. Manufacturers try to trick consumers by calling it cane sugar, high fructose corn syrup, or some other unfamiliar name, but they’re all just fancy ways of saying sugar. Molasses, honey, and maple syrup are also added sugars, and though they’re not always processed the way refined white sugar is, they have the same harmful effect, says Avena.

Sweets you can eat

The types of sugar you don’t have to ditch are found naturally in foods, such as fructose in fruit and lactose in milk products. These get a pass as long as you consume them in their original food form. “Fruit, for instance, contains an amount of sugar that is in better proportion with the amount of fiber and other nutrients in it,” says Aveda. “These other nutrients mitigate sugar’s harmful effect.”

Artificial isn’t the answer

Swapping out sugar in favor of a chemical sweetener like aspartame or saccharin may not be the answer. “Artificial sweeteners provide sweet taste without calories, so when you consume these products, hunger isn’t satisfied, leading you to crave more afterward,” says Kohn. A 2013 study in Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism lends credence to this, finding that drinking just one diet soda a day is linked to weight gain and diabetes.

Why do chemical sweeteners boost hunger? It’s not clear, but it might have to do with the intensity of the sweetness in these products. Artificial sweeteners are many times sweeter than natural sugar, and that can dull your taste buds to less intensely sweet foods such as fruit, ramping up cravings for high-sugar—and high-calorie—foods, says Kohn.

Don’t go cold turkey

Because our bodies are so used to the sweet stuff, going sugar-free very abruptly can lead to crazy-intense withdrawal symptoms such as headaches, anxiety, and mood swings, says Kohn. Ever gone without your usual morning latte or other caffeine fix? That’s what sugar withdrawal is like, times 10. “It’s better to ease yourself off it slowly by taking one step at a time, so your body has time to adjust,” says Kohn. Another reason to not be in a rush: slower changes tend to last, says Avena, especially when it comes to diet changes.

Give up sugary drinks

Soda, fruit juice, sports drinks, iced tea—these and other sweetened beverages are sneaky sources of added sugar. One can of cola, for example, racks up nine teaspoons, already a third more than the six teaspoon daily limit suggested by the American Heart Association.

“Sweetened beverages or drinks made from fruit juice are like liquid sugar, and they add lots of calories without satisfying hunger,” says Avena. She suggests substituting soda for seltzer, which has no added sugar and zero calories. As for fruit-flavored beverages and fruit juice, sub in fruit-infused bottled water or water with fresh fruit slices added to it.

Ditch simple-carb sweet treats

Pastries, cookies, muffins, and other white-bread, refined-flour treats offer little nutrition-wise but are dense with added sugar. And since they’re not hard to identify, it’s easy to slash them from your diet. They mess with blood sugar levels, setting up a cycle of grabbing a donut or muffin for energy that doesn’t last, says Kohn. Instead, get your carb fix with whole grains. These are converted to sugar during digestion, but because they’re the complex kind rather than the simple type, they’re absorbed more slowly and provide steady energy.

Suss out sugary restaurant food

They don’t call it sweet and sour pork for nothing. Many types of takeout or eat-in cuisine are smothered in sauces or coatings made with added sugar. Even the crust of takeout pizza is likely to pack hidden sugar, even though you may not taste it, says Avena. Glazes, condiments, and even pasta sauces are often loaded with sugar, the same sugar that is just as harmful in a prepackaged box of cookies, she adds. Read labels carefully: look for brown sugar, corn syrup, maltose, fructose, dextrose, molasses, agave, brown rice syrup, cane sugar, cane syrup, and evaporated cane juice, which are all just other ways to say “sugar.”

Ease off the table sugar

If you’re used to adding sweetener to your food and drinks, give yourself time to ease out of the habit, suggests Kohn. Typically start your day with two spoons of sugar or honey in your tea or coffee? Cut back to one sugar for a week, then slash it to zero a week later—or sweeten it with a slice of orange or a little milk. Same thing with the sugar you put on top of French toast or cereal, or the maple syrup doused on your pancakes. Gradually reducing the amount will make it less noticeable that you’re cutting back, and you’ll be less craving-crazed for a sugar hit.

Designate a sweets drawer

If the rest of your household isn’t cutting back on sugar with you, you’re likely to see sweet treats and added-sugar products all over your kitchen, inviting temptation. “Instead, make one drawer or shelf in your kitchen the place where everyone else can stash their treats, but you don’t have to see the products every time you open the cabinet or fridge,” suggests Avena. Most of us go for the food we see first, so if you don’t see sweets, you won’t crave them, and then cave in to them, she adds.

Pile protein and healthy fats onto your plate

Cutting out sugar is the perfect excuse to indulge in more healthy fats (nuts, olive oil, avocado, dairy) and lean protein (eggs, turkey, and legumes). Both keep you feeling satiated and energized, preventing the blood sugar rise and fall that can lead to hard-to-resist sugar cravings.

protein-fat breakfast will help you start the day off right. “Have a breakfast with protein and fat as the stars, like eggs and avocado, instead of the traditional starch and sugar combo, like a muffin or sweetened cereal,” suggests Kohn.

Go with naturally sweet flavors

To satisfy a sweet tooth without resorting to the refined stuff, just look through your spice rack. Cinnamon or vanilla extract added to coffee, cereal, or baked goods offer a sweet taste without sugar’s side effects, and zero calories too, says Kohn. Other sweet spices and herbs to add to beverages and meals include chicory, ginger, nutmeg, and cardamom. Citrus zest also adds a fruity, refreshing sweetness.

http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20923984,00.html?xid=time

Consuming the Pain: My Relationship with Food and Depression by Giovannah Philippeaux

Entering the New Year I discovered two disturbing things about myself. One, I do not love myself…I do not even like myself. Two, that my diet, lack of exercise, and overall neglect of my physical health will kill me. I thought I was over my depression and suicidal ideation, I thought I had won. But I am not, some part of me still wants to kill myself, some part of me still does not have the urge to live. I do not get it. I do not get how I could be so blind to the struggle that is still raging within me. Maybe I did not want to see it? Maybe it is just easier to ignore?

This was a gradual realization but it all hit home when reading an article about a severely obese man who had lost his life as a result of his struggle with weight. First featured in the San Antonio Express-News, the pictorial essay depicted the heartbreaking life of Hector Garcia Jr. who remarked that he could not remember a time when he was truly happy. Prior to reading this article, I was excited to be gaining weight. My short-term goal was to reach two hundred pounds. I was, and still am, excited about being fat; I am oddly comfortable with the idea of gaining weight. “Trying to make that 2-0-0” became my personal mantra.

Being big, having layers has always been my form of protection. It is how I ensure that I remain invisible and ignored. It is how I ensure that I am not a challenge; everyone’s comfortable with the ugly fat chick. Being big feels good to me, it feels comfortable, and it feels safe. But after reading that article, I realize that it is also what will kill me.

I have already begun to experience some of the side effects of being overweight. I hate climbing stairs because by the time I get to the top I am out of breath. Carrying a load of laundry while climbing is even worse, it automatically leads to huffing and puffing. I have started to have leg and joint pains. Not a day goes by without me experiencing some pain in my legs, hips, or thighs. Worst of all, I have started to have chest pains right around my heart. A flutter or sharp stab, quick and noticeable pains that are clearly telling me that something is not right. Part of me does not care and another is too scared to confront it. I excuse my behavior by saying “well we all have to go somehow” or “we are all going to die anyway.”

My family has a long and extensive history of heart disease…heart attacks, strokes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol. These should all be warning signs, but I just do not care enough about myself to make a change, to do something different. So I sit and eat, consuming my pain, my anger, my hurt. Packing on layers of fat disguised as comfort; being too detached from my own self, from my own body to accept that I am killing it. Because deep down, I still do not care. I still do not like nor love myself. I still do not feel worthy of existence, of health, of beauty, or of confidence.

It is a struggle, a struggle that I still have not committed to fighting.

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Salubrious Saturday – Your Brain On Sugar

Ohhhh Sweets!!! Mmmmm… I could go for a cheesecake. You know one that’s really fresh, made from scratch, and just waiting to be eaten. Until someone can create a vegetable that tastes like that, I’m not giving up cheesecake. But I digress. Let’s get to the point of this week’s health video, “How Sugar Affects The Brain.” Well, it’s no surprise that sugar acts like an addictive substance, just see me on Valentine’s day. But how bad is it? According to the brains at TED-Ed, it’s not good at all. But what’s a person supposed to do. Enjoy!